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The Butchart Chronicles : September 22, 2017

Flower and Garden Report September 22nd - 29th

Flower and Garden Report September 22nd – 28th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Summer is changing to fall. You can see it in the surrounding forest, it is evident in the garden. The leaves have begun to change color as the days get shorter and the nights get colder. Seasons have their way of naturally evolving and we welcome the change with excitement.

The Gardens are nothing but gorgeous in the autumn. Flower beds filled with Chrysanthemums flow with rich fall color and as the season progresses the deciduous trees turn shades of brilliant reds, vibrant oranges and warm yellows. The rapture of Dahlias is beyond compare. From giant Cactus forms to delicate Waterlily forms, it is easy to spend time lost in total amazement. 

Interesting berries and seed pods can be found around The Gardens. Aronia melanocarpa (Black choke cherry), Cornus mas (Cornelian cherry) and Decaisnea fargesii (Dead man’s fingers) all offer significant interest to the fall garden. Hydrangea flower heads are also showy as they get great fall color.

The showstoppers of the week go to the incredible fall displays. Our talented greenhouse staff has been busy building and designing the festive displays in the main patio area and The Show Greenhouse; these displays are not to be missed! Fancy gourds, Pennisetum (Millet) and an incredible selection of unique pumpkins will be sure to bring out your fall spirit. Something about those pumpkins just make you feel good!

Beyond the seasonal display you will find exotic tropical plants and unusual flowering plants in the Show Greenhouse, located between the Blue Poppy Restaurant and the Gallery. Intense form and texture offer bold statements. Be sure to keep your eye on the ever changing display - you will always find the unexpected amongst the tropical jungle!

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Achillea (Yarrow)
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree)
  • Angelonia
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Antirrhinum (Snapdragon)
  • Aralia cordata ‘Sun King’(Japanese spikenard)
  • Aralia elata (Japanese angelica tree)
  • Arum italicum (Lords and ladies)
  • Aster ( Michaelmas daisy)
  • Begonia
  • Brugmansia (Angels’ trumpet)
  • Chelone obliqua (Turtlehead)
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum( Glory bower)
  • Colchium( Autumn crocus)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Crocosmia
  • Cyclamen coum
  • Dahlia
  • Fuchsia
  • Gomphostigma virgatum (Otterbush)
  • Helenium (Sneezeweed)
  • Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
  • Heptacodium miconioides ( Seven –son flower)
  • Hibiscus syriacus ‘Blue Bird’
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Justicia (Shrimp plant)
  • Lagerstroemeria (Crape myrtle)
  • Leonotis (Lion’s ear)
  • Lespedeza (Bush clover)
  • Lobelia speciosa
  • Magnolia
  • Mandevilla
  • Manettia (Firecracker vine)
  • Melastoma
  • Pennisetum setaceum (Purple fountain grass)
  • Penstemon (Bearded tonque)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Schizostylis (Kaffir lily)
  • Sedum (Stonecrop)
  • Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda tree)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Tricyrtis (Toad lily)
  • Verbena
  • Vitex (Chaste tree)
  • Zinnia

 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 18, 2017

Garden Notebook - Autumn 2017

Garden Notebook – Autumn 2017

By Rick Los, Director of Horticulture

Sunken Garden, early autumn 2016

As I started putting my thoughts together about what I was going to write for you, I came across something that I wrote a couple of years ago at this very same time. It was amazing how my feelings were exactly the same as I feel now and I have to admit that even after 20 years as the Director of Horticulture, I’m always relieved that we (the gardeners and the garden) survived another summer!

If the garden had the ability, I’m sure that it would follow the lead of our gardeners and let out a sigh of relief as we are able to take a break from the overwhelming demands of summer. The demands that I’m talking about come in many different forms and I feel obligated to mention some of them before we proceed to the autumn season.

As many of you know, we welcome the vast majority of our visitors during the months of June through September. Expectations from our visitors during the summer months are typically very high and although we cherish that challenge, the pressure to keep the garden looking its absolute best can be very demanding.

I’ll start with the lawns as they are probably the most overlooked feature in our garden. To begin with, there are over 60 concerts that take place in the gardens during July and August, which means that the lawns have to endure that many consecutive nights of heavy traffic. Adding to that pressure on the lawns are the 10 fireworks shows that draw thousands of visitors each Saturday night, and due to the sheer volume of these crowds, they are at times squeezed off of the lawns and pathways and into some of our display borders.

One of the over 60 concerts that takes place on the Concert Lawn over the summer

To be sure, visitors are not the only ones responsible for damaging the plants as the onslaught of pests and diseases that are part of the joys of the summer garden also need to be carefully managed. One final challenge that I should mention are the added demands on our irrigation systems and water supply as the frequency of summer drought conditions has been increasing.

Thankfully our gardeners are very resilient and are experts on the daily preservation, restoration and revitalization of the garden. Each morning they take the tired garden and somehow breathe new life into it to revive it and make it look breathtaking. All in all, summer is an endurance test for us and there is a certain sense of elation when the crowds thin out, the weather gets cooler and the refreshing rains return.

Speaking of being elated – one of the highlights that we are delighted to see in the garden at this time of year are the magnificent Dahlias. Since I’ve focused so much on challenges, I will admit that this had to be the most challenging year in our history to try and get our Dahlias to perform (or even to grow at all!) From the beginning rooting stages in the greenhouses to the viral attacks outdoors, it seemed that the poor Dahlias were destined for disaster! However, as always seems to be the case, our determined staff persevered and were able to cleverly manage the situation to the point where right now our visitors would never even know that we had any issues with these plants at all. Looking at the current health of the plants myself, I find it hard to believe that we endured any of the struggles that we did.

The Dahlia border is home to over 600 plants

Dahlias are exceptional in that they provide the widest and wildest assortment of flower colours, shapes and sizes of any plant that we grow. The plants themselves can also be massive as some grow to heights of over 10 feet tall! This is truly a plant that must be seen to be appreciated and with our main Dahlia border containing over 600 plants, this border is a key component of our early fall display.

At this time of year not all of the colour in the garden is provided by flowers and it could be argued that perhaps the most brilliant colour comes from some of our trees. One tree in particular that adds stunning visual interest to the fall landscape is the Japanese maple. In my mind, there is no plant that can match the versatility and year-round beauty of the Japanese maple (Acer palmatum).  These undemanding and durable trees come in many different shapes and sizes, but it’s the sensational fall colour that really sets these trees apart. Japanese maples are loved by gardeners and by plant breeders alike, and at last count there were over 700 named cultivars of these unique trees. We also dearly love these trees and are quite proud of the fact that our garden is home to some of the oldest and largest Japanese maple trees in Canada.

Japanese maples showing off thir vibrant fall colours along one of the pathways

Autumn is an extremely busy time in the garden and the biggest project for us is the replanting of the multitude of display borders with biennials and bulbs. Although the overall planning is finely tuned, the actual scheduling of this planting process is generally determined by when the summer plantings collapse. In essence, even though we like to give ourselves the credit, it’s really Mother Nature who guides our daily decisions. Our fall planting consists of close to 300,000 bulbs which are planted among tens of thousands of colourful biennials such as English daisy (Bellis), Forget-me-Not (Myosotis), Wallflower (Cheiranthus) and Pansy (Viola). We do get some colour from these plantings from November through February, but the real excitement takes place from March through May in what many consider to be the most magnificent spring floral display in the world.

It’s a bit of an irony to think that as we are planting the garden we are also harvesting our compost piles. Many people would be totally unaware that we harvest any kind of crop at all (besides flowers), but a few years ago we came up with a brilliant idea to plant a cover crop of pumpkins and gourds on our massive piles of compost. This was obviously a match made in heaven as the pumpkins thrived on the warmth and abundance of nutrients from the compost. However, what is especially beneficial to us is that pumpkins and gourds are allelopathic, which is to say that they inhibit other plants (read weeds) from growing amongst them. The final result for us is a (almost) weed free compost pile with the bonus of a bumper crop of a ridiculous variety of unconventional, conventional and novelty pumpkins and gourds that we use in various displays around the property.

Gourds and pumpkins grown in the compost, being used in an autumn display

So even though this may appear to be a quieter season, there is still plenty of activity in and around the garden. As always, we invite you to come out and experience all that we have to offer during this very special season – the season where the garden transitions from the spectacular colour and warmth of summer to softer tones and coolness of the autumn season.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

Flower and Garden Report September 15th - 21st

Flower and Garden Report September 15th – 21st, 2017

By Thea Hegland

The timeless beauty of The Butchart Gardens leaves you spellbound. I know. I caught the feverish excitement about the legendary garden before I ever came to visit.

Both of my beloved grandmothers held it in high regard. It was the place to bring relatives and visitors from out of town to impress – that was certain. Over tea (special tea from Butchart Gardens) there were tales about the beautiful scented Roses, lavish Begonias and the bluest Delphiniums ever seen. The Butchart Gardens calendar was very important. I devoured the pages and longed to visit one day. Finally, my mother brought me and my lifelong bond with The Gardens took hold.

That hold is contagious. The 12 Month pass holders are just as passionate about The Gardens. They come often and bring guests from all over the world to share the experience. It is a very special place we are all proud of. Word travels far and wide and pictures capture the beauty but nothing compares to the feeling you get when you are here.

These days are buzzing with activity. Visitors are coming into The Plant Identification Centre with many complex questions. With so many wonders of the garden to peak interest, it’s a great service to take advantage of. Behind the scenes greenhouse staff are busy taking a variety of cuttings to propagate in our greenhouses for next year’s display. These cuttings include a variety of Geraniums, Heliotrope, and Fuchsia that account for about 10 percent of our total plants for next season.

The Gardens are simply not ready to rest. The Brugmansia (Angels’ trumpet) has burst into full glorious bloom. Dazzling peach trumpet-shaped, night-scented flowers have never looked so good.  Located on the Top Patio in containers, you will be sure to be impressed. The Dahlia Border is bold and blazing with colorful blossoms. The tropical Hibiscus plants are brightly shining in mixed containers while the hardy Hibiscus moscheutos (Common rose mallow) are catching the eye.

I hope you enjoy The Gardens!

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Achillea (Yarrow)
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree)
  • Angelonia
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Antirrhinum (Snapdragon)
  • Aralia cordata ‘Sun King’(Japanese spikenard)
  • Aralia elata (Japanese angelica tree)
  • Arum italicum (Lords and ladies)
  • Aster ( Michaelmas daisy)
  • Begonia
  • Brugmansia (Angels’ trumpet’)
  • Cephalaria (Giant scabiosa)
  • Cereus ‘Queen of The Night’ (Night blooming cactus)
  • Chelone obliqua (Turtlehead)
  • Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum( Glory bower)
  • Clethra (Summersweet)
  • Colchium( Autumn crocus)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Crocosmia
  • Dahlia
  • Fuchsia
  • Helenium (Sneezeweed)
  • Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
  • Heptacodium miconioides ( Seven –son flower)
  • Hibiscus syriacus ‘Blue Bird’
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Justicia (Shrimp plant)
  • Lagerstroemeria (Crape myrtle)
  • Leonotis (Lion’s ear)
  • Lespedeza (Bush clover)
  • Lobelia speciosa
  • Manettia (Firecracker vine)
  • Persicaria (Knotweed)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Schizostylis (Kaffir lily)
  • Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda tree)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Tecoma
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Tricyrtis (Toad lily)
  • Verbena
  • Vitex (Chaste tree)
  • Zauschneria ( California fuchsia)
  • Zinnia

 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

Annual 12 Month Passholder Shopping Event

Annual 12 Month Pass Holder Holiday Shopping Event

November 23rd, 2017

3:30pm - 7:00pm

Do you have a 12 Month Pass? Join us for the annual shopping event reserved just for you!

Bring a friend! (due to limited capacity, only 1 guest per cardholder). Your guest  also receives the 12 Month Pass Holder’s 10% discount on this special evening

This event will give you a head start on your holiday shopping with a great selection of merchandise and accessories.

Here are a few things to look forward to at this year's event

  • Representatives from some of our local product lines suchs as Queen Bee Farms
  • Local artist Richard Shaw
  • Great draw prizes
  • Tasty food sampling created by our culinary team

Light refreshments will be available for purchase in The Coffee Shop which remains open until 7pm.

The Visitor Information Centre will remain open for those who need to renew of their 12 Month Pass, and of course, for those wishing to purchase a pass.

Please note: Each 12 Month Pass holder must arrive with their guest after 3:30pm and before 7pm.

The floral gardens will be closed for viewing at 3:30pm. The entrance gate will close at 7pm.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

Chef's Corner

Learn How to Make Cauliflower Camembert Bisque

Meals are all about bringing family and friends together in a delicious way. Our culinary team is pleased when a dish is so well recieved, it inspires them to share the recipe so you can try it at home. This soup was featured on both the summer lunch and dinner menus in the Dining Room Restaurant

Try the recipe for: Cauliflower Camembert Bisque

"A bowl of hearty flavour to warm up on a cool autumn day"
"Velvety and smooth"
"Delicious and full of flavor"

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The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

2017 Magic of Christmas Dinner & Dance

Gather your friends or colleagues for the annual festive Magic of Christmas Dinner and Dance at The Butchart Gardens.

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We invite you to ring in the Christmas season with a night of festivities at The Butchart Gardens.

This adult-oriented event features festive food, dancing, live music, cash bar service and your exclusive viewing of the Magic of Christmas display. It is the perfect setting for a Christmas party with your friends or colleagues.

Feast on a delicious buffet dinner prepared by our culinary experts while you relax and listen to live music. Our chefs have planned a palate-pleasing menu that is set to impress. The menu will be published here October 2nd.

After dinner, our Carollers will lead you for a traditional stroll through The Gardens, to enjoy the sights and sounds of the season. Your exclusive preview of our annual Christmas lights display as they transform The Gardens into a festive wonderland will be sure to put you in the holiday spirit.

To complete the evening, return to The Blue Poppy Restaurant to indulge in a selection of sumptuous desserts, then dance to fabulous live music with The Chris Millington Band.

EVENT DETAILS

This event is Saturday November 25th - 6:30pm to 11:30pm.

  • $99 per person + tax. Price includes exclusive access to The Gardens and gratuities.
  • Reservations are required. We recommend reserving soon to secure a spot for your group as the event will sell out fast!

We will begin taking reservations Monday, September 25th

Our talented culinary team is finalizing the menu. It will be published October 2nd

Contact: Group Services (8:30am-5:00pm)
250-652-4422 extention 320


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The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

Summer 2017: A Season in Review

Highlights from Summer 2017

A season in review

It's hard to believe that the long hot days of summer are beginning to get shorter and the nights longer and cooler. While we are sad to say goodbye to the sunny summer months, we are also very much looking forward to everything that autumn brings. From vibrant fall foliage and seasonal blooms to cozy sweaters and warm drinks.

Before we jump into autumn, let's take a look back at some of the highlights from summer 2017.

1. An Amazing Summer Concert Series

There were over 60 consecutive performances this summer by bands from all across Canada. Every night hundreds, and sometimes thousands, of visitors gathered on the Concert Lawn to enjoy the evening entertainment. The Ricky Skaggs special event on August 16th attracted a lively bluegrass audience from near and far. The annual Victoria Symphony performance, lead by Tania Miller, was a huge hit with their melodies filling The Gardens with delight. Thank you to all the performers and visitors who joined us for Spectacular Summer Evenings.

2. Water Stations in Full Effect


As you may know, on World Water Day this past March, The Butchart Gardens implemented "Banning the Bottle". In other words, from March 22nd onward, we no longer sell single-use plastic water bottles. This move will eliminate 80,000 single-use plastic water bottles each year from the environment. Visitors supported this movement by bringing their own reusable bottles to fill up an any of the water stations located throughout The Gardens.

Tip for pet owners: many of these water stations also have a mini water station for your four-legged friend(s).

3. Canada 150 Presence

2017 is a big year for Canada. Locals and visitors alike are partaking in celebrations and activities throughout the year to recognize Canada's 150th anniversary. Our gardening department has kept this theme in mind with many of their beds and borders through the spring and summer months. In addition, on the Fireworks Lawn, there has been a giant '150' with an infinity symbol made with seasonal flowers since spring. It started by bursting into bloom with hundreds of red and white tulips that were later replaced with begonias.

In addition to our 150 themed plantings, Harbour Air's Canada 150 float plane made regular appearances in Butchart Cove.

4. Named a Top 10 Attraction in Canada by USA Today

USA Today opened up polls to its readers to vote on a number of "10 Top" categories. In the "Top 10 Attractions in Canada" category, The Butchart Gardens was listed among twenty destinations. Over the course of four weeks voters from all over the world voted daily for their favourites. In the end, The Butchart Gardens was named one of the top 10.

This summer brought visitors from around the globe and we look forward to welcoming more in the upcoming seasons. Stay up-to-date with events and current blooms by following Butchart Gardens on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

New Arrivals at the Seed and Gift Store

Two Canadian Products You Won't Want to Miss at The Seed and Gift Store and Gallery

The Seed and Gift Store, and corresponding seasonal Gallery, are always sourcing exciting new products to showcase and sell in their stores.

This season, we would like to turn your attention to two Canadian brands that our new to The Butchart Gardens.

1. Wild Coast Perfumery

These all-natural perfumes feature scents named after various west coast locations. Each of these scents is inspired by the smell and essence of that location. For example, Tofino perfume features sweet and citrusy blended with wild rose, Western Red Cedar and Juniper -- a reflection of the collection of smells one might experience during an adventure in Tofino.

These products do not contain synthetics, petrochemicals, artificial fragrance oils, dyes, parabens, phthalates or chemicals of any kind.


Fun fact: a member of the Gift Store staff suffers from asthma and is typically very sensitive to perfumed products. She has not experienced any issues in the presence of these perfumes.

You will find Wild Coast Perfumery products in the Gallery because these products are created right here on the island.

2. Fire and Ice Canadian Diamonds

Treat yourself or a loved one to an original Canadian diamond. Choose a stunning bracelet, unique necklace or glistening earrings. These are truly Canadian products with diamonds mines located throughout Canada in Northwest Territories, Ontario and Quebec and the jewellery 100% designed and handcrafted in Ontario.


Each Maple Leaf Collection item sold at The Seed and Gift Store includes a certificate of origin, leatherette passport and matching box.

Please note: Fire and Ice Diamond products are currently not available in our online store so we encourage you to visit.

We hope you have the chance see these items for yourself this season at The Gardens.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

How to Prepare a Rose Garden for Winter

How to Prepare a Rose Garden for Winter

By John Hill, Rose Garden Supervisor

As the summer season winds down in the Rose Garden, the level of work required to maintain the roses also slows down. Let the six Butchart Rose Garden tasks serve as tips for your own roses.

1. Deadheading 101

Instead of deadheading (removing spent flowers) twice a week, we will continue to lightly deadhead them as needed, which typically will be once a week in mid-September until they no longer require any deadheading at all by mid-October. Reducing deadhead frequency gives the rose canes a chance to start to harden off for the winter.   

2. Fertilizing Patterns

All fertilizing of the roses stopped by the end of July in order to stop promoting new growth. As the days and nights begin to cool in September, the need to irrigate will be reduced from four days to two days each week. When we begin to receive sufficient rainfall, irrigation is eventually stopped altogether.

3. Potassium Sulfate Best Practices

Starting in late September we spray the roses with potassium sulfate on a weekly basis for three weeks in a row. This helps to accelerate the hardening off process of the roses for the winter. Since we started doing this a few years ago, I have found that we hardly have any black canes in the spring due to frost damage. We continue to monitor the roses for insect and disease throughout this season as well.

4. Cutting Back

At the end of October, or early November, we will cut down the roses in the foregrounds to about two feet tall and the roses in the backgrounds will be cut down to approximately four and a half feet. This will leave the plants at a uniform height for the winter and helps to prevent long canes from whipping around in the wind or breaking off from excessive snow loads.

5. Cleanup Secrets

At this time, we also remove all of the remaining leaves on the plants and clean up any debris or weeds from the garden one last time. Removing the leaves helps to remove any disease spores and cleans the garden up so we don’t have leaves blowing around in the winter. We do not compost these leaves; we either burn or bury them in our fill pile.     

6. Mulching for Protection

Once these tasks are completed, we mulch our Hybrid tea roses with a 50/50 mix of screened leaf mulch and screened woods chip mulch which we produce on site. The mulch is placed around the base of each rose to about ten inches high to help protect the crowns of the plants from frost damage. In early spring, about 75% of the mulch is removed with the remainder left behind to amend the soil.

With all of these tasks completed, the Rose garden can take a well-deserved rest for the winter.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 8, 2017

Flower and Garden Report September 8th - 14th, 2017

Flower and Garden Report September 8th – 14th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

There is a new vibe at The Gardens this week. Days are filled with sunshine and the September evening light brings a peaceful feeling. The pace has slowed down and it seems all the wonders of the garden have a lingering effect. With no end in sight to the endless beautiful flowers, it must be magic.

This is one of the best times to visit. Fabulous hanging baskets and container plantings look fresh and vibrant, flowing with nearly 200 different varieties including an incredible array of Fuchsia, unique Begonias and other complementary texture plants they are simply unparalleled. Meticulous maintenance ensures these showstoppers will carry on through September and into October.

In September the turf crew carries out the annual lawn maintenance, aerating the rolling green lawns of The Gardens. Meanwhile, our gardeners are busy planting flower beds with colorful Chrysanthemums, signaling fall is in the air. Fall flowering bulbs such as Colchium (Autumn crocus) and Schizostylis coccinea (Kaffir lily) are popping up around the garden with splashes of color. Many shrubs and trees are forming berries and interesting seed pods. In the Japanese Garden the bright orange–red berries of Arum italicum (Lords and ladies) bring interest to the quiet garden, while the Dahlia border gets bolder each day as it works up to its peak season.

Always evolving, The Gardens offer daily delights and never lack surprises!

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Achillea
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree)
  • Angelonia
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Antirrhinum (Snapdragon)
  • Arum italicum (Lords and ladies)
  • Aster ( Michaelmas daisy)
  • Begonia
  • Buddleja (Butterfly bush)
  • Cephalaria (Giant scabiosa)
  • Cereus ‘Queen of The Night’ (Night blooming cactus)
  • Chelone obliqua (Turtlehead)
  • Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum ugandense ( Blue glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum( Glory bower)
  • Clethra (Summersweet)
  • Colchium( Autumn crocus)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Crocosmia
  • Dahlia
  • Duranta  ‘Sapphire Showers’
  • Echinacea (Coneflower)
  • Fuchsia
  • Gladiolus callianthus
  • Helenium (Sneezeweed)
  • Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
  • Heptacodium miconioides ( Seven –son flower)
  • Hibiscus syriacus ‘Blue Bird’
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Lagerstroemeria (Crape myrtle)
  • Leonotis (Lion’s ear)
  • Lespedeza (Bush clover)
  • Lilium (Lily)
  • Lobelia speciosa
  • Manettia (Firecracker vine)
  • Persicaria (Knotweed)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
  • Schizostylis (Kaffir lily)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Tecoma
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Verbena
  • Vitex
  • Zauschneria ( California fuchsia)
  • Zinnia
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