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The Butchart Chronicles : April 20, 2018

Flower and Garden Report - April 21st- 27th

Flower and Garden Report April 21st - 27th, 2018

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

The big question these days is when will the Tulips be at their peak?

Perhaps a simple question but it can be somewhat of a challenge to answer it in the simplest of manners. First, there the variables to consider and ultimately these variables are all about the weather.

Some years are unseasonably warm and the plant life advances in the warmth. Other years the winter cold digs in and the garden remains on standby. Perhaps this year is neither ahead nor behind, but rather right on track in regards to historical weather patterns for southern Vancouver Island.

In my opinion, it is usually safe to say late April is a good bet to see the Tulips. Approximately 185 different varieties of Tulips are carefully chosen to ensure a long season of bloom between the early and late blooming cultivars. With The Gardens earning recognition as “World Tulip Garden Of The Year” the excitement around the this year’s show of these classic spring bulbs is mounting and we are all enjoying what has started out as promising display!

Meanwhile, it seems like a perfect spring storm of flowers; sweet fragrant blossoms from the flowering Cherry and Plum trees flowing softly through the air. Flowering shrubs such as Exochorda macrantha (Pearlbush) and Amelanchier (Serviceberry) have captured attention this week, and of course, my favourite flower at this moment, the pretty blue Anemone blanda (Grecian windflower) that cover the banks on either side of the exit path from the Sunken Garden. Some of the most beautiful things in life are actually quite simple; such as the powerful presence these simple blue daisy flowers instill in the garden.

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:

  • Anemone (Grecian windflower)
  • Anemonella (Rue anemone)
  • Arabis
  • Arisarium probosicideum (Mouse plant)
  • Aubrieta
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
  • Brunnera macrophylla
  • Calluna (Scotch heather)
  • Camellia
  • Cardamine
  • Caltha (Marsh marigold)
  • Chaenomeles (Flowering Quince)
  • Chionodoxa
  • Cornus nuttallii (Pacific dogwood)
  • Corylopsis (Winter hazel)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Crocus
  • Cyclamen
  • Daphne mezereum
  • Daphne odora (Winter daphne)
  • Dicentra (Bleeding heart)
  • Doronicum (Leopard’s bane)
  • Epimedium (Barren wort)
  • Erica (Heather)
  • Erysimum (Wallflower)
  • Erythronium tuolumnense (Trout lily)
  • Forsythia
  • Fritillaria elwesii (Fritillary)
  • Fritillaria imperialis (Crown imperial)
  • Fritillaria meleagris (Checkered lily)
  • Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop)
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Hepatica nobilis
  • Hyacinthus
  • Illicium
  • Kerria japonica
  • Leucojum (Snowflake)
  • Lonicera fragrantissima (Honeysuckle)
  • Lysichiton (Skunk cabbage)
  • Magnolia x soulangeana
  • Magnolia stellata (Star magnolia)
  • Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
  • Muscari (Grape hyacinth)
  • Myosotis (Forget-me-not)
  • Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Narcissus (Daffodil)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Ornithogalum
  • Pericallis (Painted daisy)
  • Petasites
  • Polygala chamaebuxus
  • Pulmonaria (Lungwort)
  • Pulsatilla vulgaris (Lungwort)
  • Pieris (Lily -of - the valley shrub)
  • Primula (Primrose)
  • Prostanthera rotundifolia (Mint bush)
  • Prunus (Flowering cherry and plum)
  • Ranunculus ficaria ‘Brazen Hussey’
  • Rhododendron
  • Ribes (Flowering currant)
  • Rubus spectabilis (Salmonberry)
  • Schizanthus (Butterfly flower)
  • Scilla (Squill)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Spiraea (Spirea)
  • Trillium ovatum
  • Tulipa
  • Viburnum tinus
  • Vinca (Periwinkle)
  • Viola

 
The Butchart Chronicles : April 13, 2018

Flower and Garden Report April 13th - 20th, 2018

Flower and Garden Report April 13th - 20th, 2018

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Hard work truly does pay off. It is amazing what can be accomplished with some vision and talent; you just have to start somewhere and see how things evolve. I believe that is how The Gardens have become what they are today. Jennie Butchart was an incredible woman. An aspiring artist as a young woman, she had a strong sense of determination as she embarked on the daunting task that lay before her with passion and enthusiasm.

The Sunken Garden, regarded by many as the “Jewel” of the garden, was once a desolate space that she transformed from a barren quarry after the limestone and clay was depleted for manufacturing cement in the factory that Mr. Butchart operated in Tod Inlet. She didn’t stop there… the renowned garden is Jennie’s lasting legacy for the world to enjoy.

Still traditionally planted each year, are the classics that Jennie valued in her garden. From the dramatic plantings of Tulipa (Tulip) and Narcissus (Daffodil) underplanted with Myosotis (Forget-me-not) to the dainty favorites such as Chionodoxa, Fritillaria, Scilla, and Primula are amongst the sea of early spring flowering delights. The carefully selected flowering trees and shrubs trees added to The Gardens over the years have brought timeless beauty to the enchanting garden.

Nearly 40 different cultivars of the finest Camellia shrubs are blooming profusely in all the glorious forms from soft pinks, bold reds and shades of white. The elegant beauty of Prunus ‘Mt. Fuji’ (Flowering cherry) still has the power to stun us all and while many varieties of Cherries can be found in The Gardens, it is the pristine white simplicity of these flowers that symbolize the classic style that Jennie deeply instilled in her garden.

Far beyond the spectacular early spring colour are the little treasures of the peaceful Japanese Garden. Trillium ovatum (Coast trillium) and Erythronium revolutum (Trout lily) seem right in place. Look carefully and you will find the rare Trillium ovatum ‘Flore Pleno (Double trillium) if you are lucky.

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest

  • Anemone (Grecian windflower)
  • Anemonella (Rue anemone)
  • Arabis
  • Aubrieta
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
  • Brunnera macrophylla
  • Calluna (Scotch heather)
  • Camellia
  • Cardamine
  • Caltha (Marsh marigold)
  • Chaenomeles (Flowering Quince)
  • Chionodoxa
  • Cornus nuttallii (Pacific dogwood)
  • Corylopsis (Winter hazel)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Crocus
  • Cyclamen
  • Daphne mezereum
  • Daphne odora (Winter daphne)
  • Epimedium (Barren wort)
  • Erica (Heather)
  • Erysimum (Wallflower)
  • Erythronium tuolumnense (Trout lily)
  • Forsythia
  • Fritillaria elwesii (Fritillary)
  • Fritillaria imperialis (Crown imperial)
  • Fritillaria meleagris (Checkered lily)
  • Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop)
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Hepatica nobilis
  • Hyacinthus
  • Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
  • Kerria japonica
  • Leucojum (Snowflake)
  • Lonicera fragrantissima (Honeysuckle)
  • Lysichiton (Skunk cabbage)
  • Magnolia x soulangeana
  • Magnolia stellata (Star magnolia)
  • Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
  • Muscari (Grape hyacinth)
  • Myosotis (Forget-me-not)
  • Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Narcissus (Daffodil)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Ornithogalum
  • Polygala chamaebuxus
  • Pulmonaria (Lungwort)
  • Pulsatilla vulgaris (Lungwort)
  • Pieris (Lily -of - the valley shrub)
  • Primula (Primrose)
  • Prostanthera rotundifolia (Mint bush)
  • Prunus (Flowering cherry and plum)
  • Ranunculus ficaria ‘Brazen Hussey’
  • Rhododendron
  • Ribes (Flowering currant)
  • Rubus spectabilis (Salmonberry)
  • Scilla (Squill)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Spiraea (Spirea)
  • Trillium ovatum
  • Tulipa
  • Viburnum tinus
  • Vinca (Periwinkle)
  • Viola

 
The Butchart Chronicles : April 5, 2018

Flower and Garden Report April 6 - 12th, 2018

Flower and Garden Report April 6-12th, 2018

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Early_Spring10.jpg

Traditional April showers have descended on The Gardens this week and more precipitation is expected in the coming week. All this essential rain makes The Gardens hauntingly beautiful; such vivid colours bring intense presence amongst the looming grey mist. Deep shades of green from the pristine forest and manicured lawns provide the perfect contrast to the flowering gems found in the garden.

Don’t let the rain fool you. Early spring is one of the most interesting times to visit The Gardens. Everything just seems so fresh and alive with promising buds on the flora awaiting the perfect moment to reveal the mystery…what exactly is that plant? Often, I find myself pondering just that. Identifying plants is fascinating and after years of working at The Gardens amongst the flowers and trees I have come to realize that it is not daunting at all. Learning to recognize certain characteristics of the plant life is key. After that, following the clues will lead the way to solving the mystery… eventually!

I have to admit, there are still a few unsolved cases in the garden but the truth is out there! The Plant Identification Centre here at The Gardens serves the visitors and staff alike - it is the place to visit if you seek answers. Fresh plant samples are on display and knowledgeable staff are equipped to help navigate the plant material at The Gardens.

Magnolia madness has hit The Gardens with more than 28 varieties amongst the impressive collection flowering in full glory. The spring flowering bulbs have begun to gain momentum and you will find endless beds filled with Hyacinthus (Hyacinth), Narcissus (Daffodil) and Tulipa (Tulip) complemented with gorgeous blue Myosotis (Forget-me-not) that Jennie Butchart loved so much.

Close_up_Flowers8.jpgScilla (Squill)

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:

  • Anemone (Grecian windflower)
  • Anemonella (Rue anemone)
  • Arabis
  • Aubrieta
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
  • Brunnera macrophylla
  • Calluna (Scotch heather)
  • Camellia
  • Caltha (Marsh marigold)
  • Chaenomeles (Flowering Quince)
  • Cornus mas (Cornelian cherry)
  • Corylopsis (Winter hazel)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Crocus
  • Cyclamen
  • Daphne mezereum
  • Daphne odora (Winter daphne)
  • Epimedium (Barren wort)
  • Eranthis hyemalis (Winter aconite)
  • Erica (Heather)
  • Erysimum (Wallflower)
  • Erythronium tuolumnense (Trout lily)
  • Forsythia
  • Fritillaria elwesii (Fritillary)
  • Fritillaria imperialis (Crown imperial)
  • Fritillaria meleagris (Checkered lily)
  • Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop)
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Hepatica nobilis
  • Hyacinthus
  • Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
  • Leucojum (Snowflake)
  • Lonicera fragrantissima (Honeysuckle)
  • Lysichiton (Skunk cabbage)
  • Magnolia x soulangeana
  • Magnolia stellata (Star magnolia)
  • Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
  • Muscari (Grape hyacinth)
  • Myosotis (Forget-me-not)
  • Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Narcissus (Daffodil)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Ornithogalum
  • Polygala chamaebuxus
  • Pulmonaria (Lungwort)
  • Pulsatilla vulgaris (Lungwort)
  • Pieris (Lily -of - the valley shrub)
  • Primula (Primrose)
  • Prostanthera rotundifolia (Mint bush)
  • Prunus (Flowering cherry and plum)
  • Ranunculus ficaria ‘Brazen Hussey’
  • Rhododendron
  • Ribes (Flowering currant)
  • Scilla (Squill)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Spiraea (Spirea)
  • Tulipa
  • Viburnum tinus
  • Vinca (Periwinkle)
  • Viola

Close_up_Flowers9.jpg

 
The Butchart Chronicles : March 30, 2018

Flower and Garden Report March 30th - April 5th, 2018

Flower and Garden Report March 30 – April 5 2018

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Early_Spring8.jpg

The past week has been an exciting one in The Gardens. Each day offers new little surprises as the spring display takes hold. The appearance of Fritillaria imperialis (Crown imperial) and Erythronium tuolumnense (Trout lily) have captured the attention of the discerning visitor. Gorgeous Magnolia trees are beginning to make a grand entrance as their striking blossoms demand full attention.

Noteworthy is the incredible collection of Narcissus (Daffodil) which is rapidly approaching garden stardom; some very extraordinary garden cultivars can be found here. An interesting thing about Narcissus is the classification of 13 distinct divisions with each division distinguishing the different flower forms. All varieties are commonly known as Daffodils; however, it is the classic bright yellow trumpet shaped flower that most are familiar with. The name Narcissus is derived from Greek mythology symbolizing beauty, prosperity and wealth, and perhaps most significantly, the arrival of spring. Available in a wide range of shapes and colours, many with a subtle, alluring fragrance and the best feature of all- DEER PROOF. That says it all, at least in our corner of the world!

Close_up_Flowers5.jpg
It is not just flowers you can find in the garden this week. Bunnies know that the best places to hide are in a garden. With Easter this weekend, children are invited to bring their families while they search the enchanting garden during the annual bunny hunt. With a promising stretch of sunshine ahead, a walk through The Gardens is bound to be an Easter highlight. Of course, there will be treats.

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Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:

  • Abeliophyllum distichum (White forsythia)
  • Anemone (Grecian windflower)
  • Anemonella (Rue anemone)
  • Arabis
  • Aubrieta
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
  • Brunnera macrophylla
  • Calluna (Scotch heather)
  • Camellia
  • Caltha (Marsh marigold)
  • Chaenomeles (Flowering Quince)
  • Cornus mas (Cornelian cherry)
  • Corylopsis (Winter hazel)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Crocus
  • Cyclamen
  • Daphne mezereum
  • Daphne odora (Winter daphne)
  • Epimedium (Barren wort)
  • Eranthis hyemalis (Winter aconite)
  • Erica (Heather)
  • Erysimum (Wallflower)
  • Erythronium tuolumnense (Trout lily)
  • Forsythia
  • Fritillaria elwesii (Fritillary)
  • Fritillaria imperialis (Crown imperial)
  • Fritillaria meleagris (Checkered lily)
  • Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop)
  • Grevillea
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Hepatica nobilis
  • Hyacinthus
  • Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
  • Leucojum (Snowflake)
  • Lonicera fragrantissima (Honeysuckle)
  • Lysichiton (Skunk cabbage)
  • Magnolia x soulangeana
  • Magnolia stellata (Star magnolia)
  • Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
  • Muscari (Grape hyacinth)
  • Myosotis (Forget-me-not)
  • Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Narcissus (Daffodil)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Ornithogalum
  • Polygala chamaebuxus
  • Pulmonaria (Lungwort)
  • Pulsatilla vulgaris (Lungwort)
  • Pieris (Lily -of - the valley shrub)
  • Primula (Primrose)
  • Prostanthera rotundifolia (Mint bush)
  • Prunus (Flowering cherry and plum)
  • Ranunculus ficaria ‘Brazen Hussey’
  • Rhododendron
  • Ribes (Flowering currant)
  • Scilla (Squill)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Spiraea (Spirea)
  • Tulipa
  • Viburnum tinus
  • Vinca (Periwinkle)
  • Viola
 
The Butchart Chronicles : March 23, 2018

Flower and Garden Report March 23rd - 30th, 2018

Flower and Garden Report March 23rd - 30th ,2018

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Early_Spring3.jpg

Spring has officially arrived and The Gardens are bursting into bloom. We welcome visitors from all over the world to come see what promises to be an amazing show this spring. Our Director of Horticulture has recently returned from a trip to Toronto where The Gardens were represented at the annual Canada Blooms show that takes place each March. We hope that being there has inspired many people throughout Canada to make the trip out west and come and visit our magnificent garden, which is a National Historic Site of Canada.

Our spectacular spring show includes approximately 180,000 biennial plants and 300, 000 bulbs; to be more specific there are 88 varieties /80,000 of Narcissus (Daffodil) bulbs, 185 varieties /160,000 of Tulipa (Tulip) bulbs as well as 60, 000 assorted bulbs of Hyacinthus (Hyacinth), Crocus, Scilla and Muscari (Grape Hyacinth) demonstrating the limitless power of flowers. With such a wide range of unique and interesting Narcissus (Daffodil) and Tulipa (Tulip) it is hard to pick a favorite. My personal favorites are Narcissus ‘Apricot Whirl’ and Tulipa ‘Angelique’, both which are yet to come.

Early_Spring7.jpg

Up by the Concert Lawn the amazing turf crew has just completed work on refurbishing the lawn after the removal of a large solid rock in the area. Such a major project involved bringing in an excavator to chip away at the grand rock. A perfect match of turf was carefully selected and the expertise of the turf crew was put to practice as they literally rolled out the green carpet! No one can see or even imagine the scar left behind… I needed to be reminded of what had been there and I have worked here for 32 years!

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:

  • Abeliophyllum distichum (White forsythia)
  • Anemone (Grecian windflower)
  • Arabis
  • Aubrieta
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
  • Calluna (Scotch heather)
  • Camellia
  • Caltha (Marsh marigold)
  • Chaenomeles (Flowering Quince)
  • Cornus mas (Cornelian cherry)
  • Corylopsis (Winter hazel)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Crocus
  • Cyclamen
  • Daphne odora
  • Eranthis hyemalis (Winter aconite)
  • Erica (Heather)
  • Fritillaria elwesii (Fritillary)
  • Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop)
  • Garrya elliptica (Silk- tassel bush)
  • Grevillea
  • Hamamelis (Witch hazel)
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Hepatica nobilis
  • Hyacinthus
  • Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
  • Leucojum (Snowflake)
  • Lonicera fragrantissima (Honeysuckle)
  • Magnolia x soulangeana
  • Magnolia stellata (Star magnolia)
  • Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
  • Myosotis (Forget-me-not)
  • Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Narcissus (Daffodil)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Parrotiopsis jacquemontiana
  • Polygala chamaebuxus
  • Pulsatilla vulgaris (Lungwort)
  • Pieris (Lily -of - the valley shrub)
  • Primula (Primrose)
  • Prostanthera rotundifolia (Mint bush)
  • Prunus (Flowering cherry and plum)
  • Ranunculus ficaria ‘Brazen Hussey’
  • Rhododendron
  • Ribes (Flowering currant)
  • Scilla (Squill)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Tulipa
  • Viburnum x bodnantense
  • Viburnum tinus
  • ViolaClose_Up_-_Flowers_-_2017_-_DSC_6344.JPG.jpg
 
The Butchart Chronicles : March 23, 2018

Garden Notebook Spring 2018

 Garden Notebook - spring 2018

By Rick Los, Director of Horticulture


There never seems to be a clearly defined sequence to any natural process in the garden and that in itself is one of the most fascinating aspects of what we do. Our best laid plans get derailed during the spring season more than at any other time of the year as so many factors impact the garden as it comes into bloom. Perhaps I’m getting less patient as I age, but for some reason I have never had such a strong yearning for the spring season (including the warmer temperatures that go along with it!) than I have this year.


It’s really no surprise that most gardeners and for that matter, most human beings in this part of the world, look forward to spring! The cherry, plum, apple and crabapple trees burst into bloom and the entire grounds seem to explode with colour (and fragrance!) as tens of thousands of bulbs artfully accentuate the magnificent flora throughout the Gardens. Early in the springtime our gardening activities increase as the weather warms up and you can sense an almost tangible energy being exuded from the garden – an energy that demands our attention. The incredible natural beauty of this season energizes and inspires us as the garden completely transforms itself after its winter slumber.

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Although there haven’t been any large scale physical changes to the Gardens this past winter, we have made subtle improvements in many areas. Probably the biggest project was the reconstruction of the path and patio area that overlooks the Single Jet Fountain. This project allowed us to provide easier access to the area as well as a slightly larger patio. As you all well know, the garden is not a static creation, but rather it’s an ongoing (or shall I say, never ending) project that, in part, involves the continuous reorganization of shrub and perennial borders. Throughout the Gardens we focus on proper spacing as well as providing the plants with optimal growing conditions. As we are an older garden that continues to mature, conditions continue to change and we can never stop focusing on ensuring that we have appropriate plants situated in their optimal location. Our main objective is to always maximize the amount of year-round interest as well as expanding the diversity of colour that we can provide for our visitors. The ongoing introduction of new and exciting varieties of plants is also something that we try to focus on as we realize that many of our discerning visitors are searching for interesting plants that they can utilize in their own gardens.

One of the most important early season tasks in the garden is the cultivation of the soil throughout all of our borders. This is a time consuming, but very beneficial task that breaks up the hard, compacted soil surface allowing air, water and nutrients to penetrate. Compacted soil is also an issue for our lawns and spring is a great time to revitalize any lawn by de-thatching and aerating, over seeding the bare patches, topdressing and fertilizing. I can’t overemphasize the importance of air to the roots of plants, so if you only have a chance to do one thing to your lawn this spring I would suggest going with the aerating. Research has proven how oxygen improves the growth and stimulation of healthy roots and now many greenhouses and golf courses are actually injecting oxygen into their irrigation water to improve overall plant vigour and health. For greenhouse growers this means a better product and for golf courses this may mean an earlier start up date, quicker turf regeneration and also the need for less fertilizer.   

Speaking of greenhouses……perhaps the busiest area for us at this time of year is our 2 acres of greenhouse production facilities. These facilities are a beehive of activity as more than 16 staff members work tirelessly to produce the thousands of plants that have been lovingly grown for our meticulously planned summer garden display. The planting of the summer display doesn’t begin until the latter part of May, so our greenhouse staff have a couple of months to ensure that the plants are as healthy, vigorous and colourful as they can possibly be when it comes time to plant them out in the garden.

We begin to prune our roses and hydrangeas in mid-March when the threat of a hard frost has passed for us. Around the greater Victoria region this can usually be done a little bit earlier, but ironically our microclimate is a little bit colder. I sometimes joke that as fabulous as our garden setting is, Jennie Butchart chose one of the most challenging microclimates in the region for her garden. However, this apparent disadvantage does generally work in our favour as our spring display can last a full two weeks longer than what you would find in Victoria proper.

I believe that our Gardens are beautiful throughout the spring season, but many people will ask “When is the best time to visit?” Well, if you’re looking for sheer masses of colour I would have to say that the peak of the display generally occurs during the last two weeks of April through the first week of May. However, weather conditions are obviously a huge factor in the timing of when the bulbs come into bloom as well as how long they last so please have a little grace with us here as we can’t ever predict the precise time when the peak will occur.

I highly encourage anyone to visit our garden at this time of the year as it is truly one of the most spectacular spring gardens in the world. The weather may be a little cooler, but the crowds are a little lighter, allowing you to be able to relax and more fully appreciate the breathtaking beauty of this glorious season.  

Early_Spring1.jpg

 
The Butchart Chronicles : March 22, 2018

Chef's Corner: Papaya Salad

Recipes Directly From The Butchart Garden's Kitchen


With the arrival of spring, the grilling season has begun and we have a new recipe for you to try. Whether it is devoured as a side or a main topped with prawns, the Papaya Salad with a zingy dressing is a tasty addition to any meal. You'll love the layers of goodness and there is nothing like a healthy and satisfying salad featuring fresh ingredients. This papaya salad with sweet potato noodles and lime vinaigrette is the perfect spring dish to accompany your grilled protein of choice. Plus, it is easy to make!

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The Papaya salad is featured on our spring and summer Blue Poppy menu, so plan on trying it during your next visit. 

View the recipe.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : March 16, 2018

Flower and Garden Report March 16th - 22nd, 2018

Flower and Garden Report March 16th - 22nd, 2018

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Early_Spring6.jpgSpring fever has hit. Blossoms are bursting out everywhere and the atmosphere is alive with excitement. A recent stretch of warm sunny days has brought out many of the flowers in The Garden giving us a taste of the promising spring ahead.

The first of the Tulipa (Tulip) have emerged, many varieties of Narcissus (Daffodil) and fragrant Hyacinthus (Hyacinth) fill the endless flower beds in The Gardens, complemented by adorable Bellis (English daisy), and Myosotis (Forget- me -not). Prunus (Flowering cherry and plum) with delicate pink blooms softly flow through The Garden. Early Rhododendron are in bloom with over 300 different varieties and hundreds (and hundreds) of shrubs throughout the grounds yet to come.

Container’s filled with Prostanthera rotundifolia (Mint bush), Forsythia, Primula and different plants fill the imagination with possibilities. In the Sequoia Grove, hidden treasures such as Fritillaria elwesii (Fritillary) and Lonicera fragrantissima (Honeysuckle) can be found. In the Japanese Garden look for Polygala chamaebuxus with unique flowers producing deep purplish wings and yellow lips.

With so much in bloom outside there is no time to be sad that The Spring Prelude has ended for another year; it’s all part of the cycle of excitement. Besides, I’m pretty sure I saw people walking around with colourful cones of gelato – that can only mean one thing- The Gelataria is open for the season!
Close_up_Flowers1.jpg
Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:
Abeliophyllum distichum (White forsythia)
Anemone (Grecian windflower)
Arabis
Aubrieta
• Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
Bellis (English daisy)
Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
Camellia
Cornus mas
Correa (Australian fuchsia)
Cotoneaster
Crocus
Cyclamen
Daphne odora
Edgeworthia chrysantha (Paper bush)
Eranthis hyemalis (Winter aconite)
Erica (Heather)
Fritillaria elwesii (Fritillary)
Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop)
Garrya elliptica (Silk- tassel bush)
Grevillea
Hamamelis (Witch hazel)
Helleborus (Christmas rose)
Hyacinthus
Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
Jasminium nudiflorum (Winter jasmine)
Lonicera fragrantissima (Honeysuckle)
Magnolia
Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
Narcissus (Daffodil)
Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
Polygala chamaebuxus
Pulmonaria (Lungwort)
Pieris (Lily -of - the valley shrub)
Polyanthus (Primula)
Prostanthera rotundifolia (Mint bush)
Prunus (Flowering cherry and plum)
Pyracantha
Rhododendron
Ribes (Flowering currant)
Sarcococca (Christmas box)
Scilla (Squill)
Skimmia japonica
Tulipa
Viburnum x bodnantense
Viburnum tinus
Viola

Flower_Count.jpg

 
The Butchart Chronicles : March 15, 2018

Mother's Day at The Gardens

In May, the gardens are bursting with colour and fragrance. It is the perfect month to see spectacular spring. Bring mom or grandmother for a visit to see the colourful spring display, followed by a unique culinary experience.

Relax and savour our sumptuous Mother’s Day Lunch Buffet in the Blue Poppy Restaurant or indulge in our delightful Mother’s Day Afternoon Tea in the Dining Room Restaurant.

Annabelle's Café and the Coffee Shop will be open for refreshments and light lunches. Also, enjoy a fresh-made gelato at the Gelateria in the Italian Garden.

*Please note:  Admission to The Gardens is required for all Mother's Day events.

Mother's Day Lunch Buffet 

Sunday, May 13th only
In The Blue Poppy Restaurant

  • 11am - 3pm
  • $39.75 per person plus tax
  • Child 5 to 12 - $19.75 plus tax
  • Children under 5 years of age - Free

View the menu: Mother’s Day Lunch Buffet

For Reservations: 250-652-4422 (Group Services) ext 320 (8:30am-5:00pm)


Mother's Day Afternoon Tea 

Sunday, May 13th only
Location: The Dining Room Restaurant

  • 11am - 4pm for just $42.95 per person plus tax
  • 48 hours' notice is required to accommodate a gluten free or vegetarian tea

View the menu: Mother’s Day Afternoon Tea


Make reservations now, limited seats available: 250-652-8222

or reserve online with Open Table

 
The Butchart Chronicles : March 15, 2018

Gallery Opening Featuring New Artists

Gallery Opening Featuring New Talented Artists

Inside the Gallery, located behind the Visitor Information Centre

The Gallery, featuring stunning pieces from local artists, is opening for the season on April 1st. Over the Easter weekend, join us in welcoming a selection of artists as they demonstrate their work and answer questions.

From April 1st onward, the Gallery is open from 11am daily until October 15th.

One of the new artists featured this year is a former pottery maker, John Robertson. Now, he specializes in sculpting whimsical retakes of iconic images, made from found objects, old industrial junk, automotive parts, castoffs and leftovers from society. It is apparent that John is very skilled at his trade and we are fortunate enough to have a few pieces on display and available for sale in the Gallery this year.

One of Robertson's ships, available in the Gallery.

We look forward to showcasing local artistic talent through the spring and summer months and hope that you have a chance to come see everything on display starting April 1st.

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