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The Butchart Chronicles : January 16, 2018

Garden Notebook - Winter 2018

Garden Notebook – Winter 2018

By Rick Los, Director of Horticulture

This time of year is unique as we have both an indoor and outdoor garden open for visitors. Here's the details about both.

Indoor Spring Prelude

This year marks the 20th edition of our spectacular Spring Prelude indoor garden display as it was in January of 1999 that we initiated this concept. It really did begin as a concept without a formal plan to become what we are showcasing today - which is 20 years of evolving artistry and continuous refinement. Each year our talented staff strive to reinvent and reinvigorate this intimate garden experience to help lift our spirits and inspire us during the winter months.    

You may be thinking (or maybe not) how and why we first initiated this indoor garden display. Well, some of you may recall the famous blizzard of December 1996, where we had over a meter of snow fall in our region over a 24-hour period. The snow devastated many areas of the garden, including our greenhouses and remained with us for a long time. With the gardens submerged in this unusually deep white blanket, any visit to the garden was not quite as memorable as we would have preferred - or at least memorable in the ways that we would have preferred!

Therefore, in order to help alleviate any potential of unsatisfactory visits during our winter months, we came up with an idea to create a beautiful indoor garden for our visitors to enjoy – no matter what the weather conditions were outside. However, we did have a bit of an issue as the only facility available for us to create the garden was a restaurant! This didn’t deter us and once the transformation is complete, I don’t think that most people would even know that the Spring Prelude facility is (or was) a restaurant as there are no traces of a restaurant to be found anywhere inside! This beautiful conservatory-like restaurant facility lends itself quite well to a garden - a meticulous garden that is miraculously installed in just seven days!

Each year we have focused on a couple of different themes ranging from tropical borders accented with exotic orchids, to a temperate area which features an amazing range of more familiar plant material that is forced into bloom. The idea of different themes was intended to provide as much diversity as we could to try and satisfy the desires of as many of our visitors as possible. It’s very hard to begin to describe in detail the beauty of the display as it is truly a sensory experience – which in essence, also means that every individual will experience it in their own personal way.  


Over the past 20 years this spectacular creation has become a focal point of our winter garden experience and we sincerely hope that you have a chance to experience this beauty for yourself.

Outside Gardens

The garden is delightful during the winter months and is still the highlight of any visit – even with the competition that the indoor Spring Prelude display provides. Contrary to what most people may think, you can still find flowers in the garden regardless of what the weather conditions may be. However, in contrast with the warmer seasons, you may have to look for the flowers as in many cases they may not be very conspicuous to a casual garden observer.  

To give you an idea of the plants which we find delightful at this time of year, we have an abundance of Daphne, Edgeworthia, Mahonia, Witch Hazel, Viburnum (bodnantense), Sarcococca, Hellebore and Galanthus (Snow drops) that dependably bloom for us. We even have some rogue Narcissus (daffodils) that have begun blooming for us early in December when the weather conditions have been favorable.

As we move in the latter part of January and through February the anticipation of spring builds as subtle changes become less subtle on an almost daily basis. Crocuses probably provide the boldest seasonal impact with their striking colours and by late February they have made their presence very evident throughout the gardens. The earliest of our cherry trees begin to bloom in early March and their beauty is accentuated with pockets and/or waves of reticulata Eranthis, Iris, Scilla, Anemone blanda, Chionodoxa and Narcissus as well as many other early blooming bulbs, perennials and shrubs. Of course, this all should (emphasis on should!) bloom in harmony with our carefully planned display borders of biennials and bulbs which are perhaps the most well-known and well-loved features of our late winter garden.   

I thought that it would be fitting to provide you with a paraphrased quote that we received from one of our visitors last year.

“What I liked, however, was the garden without the crowds and that we were forced to look for the flowers and to consider the small details. The topiaries we may have otherwise overlooked as well as the water features, rocks and moss-covered trees. The beautiful stone paths, the sculptures, the tiny bulbs just starting to sprout. It’s true, there is always something to see and appreciate here – the gardens are always a treasure.”

It’s always very rewarding to hear these sentiments from a visitor, as even though we may feel the same way, it’s truly the feelings that our visitors experience during their visit that are the most important to us.

That being said, we trust that our garden will delight you at this time of the year. If you do visit and need any gardening questions answered or need help identifying any winter blooming plants, our knowledgeable team of gardeners are always more than willing to provide any assistance that they can.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : January 16, 2018

Evolution of The Seed & Gift Store

The Blue Poppy seeds sold in the Seed & Gift Store are still cultivated on the property and the tradition of hand packaging continues.

Seeds and Their History at the Seed and Gift Store

The original purpose of the Seed Store, now The Seed and Gift Store, was to package and sell seed from plants grown in the seed fields of Jennie Butchart's garden. Jennie opened the Seedhouse in 1920, with the first Benvenuto Seed Catalogue being issued at that time. Back then, seeds were only available by mail order.

Seed_sorter_DSC_9688.JPG

"The Clipper" was purchased for $50 in 1929


You may have noticed the field to your left when you're arriving and approaching the admission gates, or the left when you are driving out. This large lawn area between the entrance and exit roads was called the "Seed Field", where seeds were collected, dried and then seeds and finer chaff were separated by "The Clipper". The machine, pictured above, tumbled the seeds through a screen of varying mesh depending on the size of the seed. It separated the chaff by the agitation of tiny paddles then deposited it to the bottom box for disposal.

It was a time-consuming process of hand packaging, so a "Ballard Seed Packaging Machine" was purchased in 1975 from Concord, Massachusetts. It turned out to be a short-lived experiment as it was difficult to calibrate. The process using a high powered machine was quite daunting and the ladies in the Seed & Gift Shop went back to utilizing their tables in the store during the off season to hand sort and package seeds.

By the late 1970's it became difficult to collect pure seed as other homes and gardens were built around Benvenuto and pollinating insects often mixed the varieties, however the long history of a mail order Seed Catalogue continued with much of the seed being purchased in bulk. The seeds were used for both the gardens and packaged to sell by Seed & Gift Shop.

This hand-packaging tradition continues today, not only for nostalgic reasons, but also because it allows us to control the quality of the seed packs. This is integral in obtaining clearance for many of our seeds to enter the United States via land and air. Today, we sell over 140 different packets, most USDA approved for import into the USA, and available not only in The Seed and Gift Store but online as well.

NL_Seed_Catalogue_Cover.jpg

To this day we carry on Mrs. Butchart’s tradition of packaging seeds and selling them via mail order. A few specific varieties grown in isolated areas of the Butchart Gardens are still collected and used in our greenhouses, however the popular Blue Poppy is the only seed collected at The Gardens, and sold here.
*Hint: if our online store lists the Blue Poppy seeds "in stock", that means they are available both in store and online.

We sell approximately 100 different seeds and seed combinations. New Mixes for 2018 include: Deer Resistant, Fragrant, Edible, Shade Mix, Bird Lovers, Honey Bee, Low Growing, Western Pollinator, Monarch Butterfly. 

Our two best selling seeds are the Blue Poppy and our Anniversary Blend and are available in store or online.

Seed_Packaging_collage.png

 
The Butchart Chronicles : January 15, 2018

Chef's Corner: Greek Quinoa Salad

Chef's Corner: Greek Quinoa Salad

Straight from the Butchart kitchen

Get your New Year off to a healthy start with a fresh Greek Quinoa Salad. This makes a great side dish to accompany your main meal or tasty lunch to-go. It is also a crowd-pleaser at barbeques and potlucks.

This salad was a perennial favourite on last year's Dining Room menu and will give your quinoa a burst of flavor.

View: Greek Quinoa Salad Recipe

 
The Butchart Chronicles : January 15, 2018

The 2018 Historical Display

On Now: Step Back in Time at the 2018 Historical Display at The Butchart Gardens

From now until March 15th, join us as we showcase the 18th annual historical display. Located in the former Butchart residence, this fascinating display features memorabilia and  photographs to show the quarry to garden transformation and more.

White Room

As you enter the residence, you will be in the White Room. Here you will discover letters about the quality of the cement being porduced at the cement plant, along with samples of old cement flower pots that were produced here into the 1950's, after major cement production stopped.

Additional White Room Highlights

  • Letters from visitors requesting The Gardens as venue for events, along with pictures of these events
  • Correspondence from people throughout North America seeking Jennie Butchart's reclamation expertise
  • The story of Jennie's private garden. This is still maintained as a private display today.

Breakfast Room


After the White Room, you will enter the Breakfast Room. Here you will get a glimpse of the Butchart's travels and leisure. See their travel plans including books on Japanese gardens in preparation for their trip to Japan as well as memorabilia from their avid tennis days.

Tango Room

 The Rose Garden is a big part of Butchart history. In this room, discover the development of the Rose Garden including landscape architecture, pergola blueprints, and other references to planning. Once this garden was established, the Butchart's became members of the National Rose Society based out of London, U.K., later featured in a publication that you can see for yourself in the Tango Room.

Billiard Room

From Gardens visitors to royalty and film stars, the Butchart's regularly entertained. In the Billiard Room, you will feel as though you're one of their guests.

Billiard Room Highlights

  • Early photography - camera equipment and stereoscope demonstrations by staff
  • Musical box demonstrations as well as various games and instruments
  • A fashion flashback, looking at Robert Butchart's walking stick collection, clothing brochures and images of attire from the era
  • Photos of the indoor pool, including a letter from the Duke and Duchess of Connaught about their swimming experience

From quarry to garden, the Butchart's history is filled with interesting events and connections to current day. Let our knowledgeable and passionate staff paint you a picture of the past and walk you through time in the 2018 Historical Display.

To top off the experience, enjoy High Tea in the conservatory room of the Dining Room Restaurant, another long-standing Butchart tradition.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : January 7, 2018

Flower and Garden Report January 7th - 14th

Garden Report for the period of January 7th -14th 2018

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant


All is quiet in the New Year Garden. Or at least it seems that way on the garden front. Another year gone by, the Christmas display is once again being dismantled and the fervor is on for the incredible metamorphosis of the Blue Poppy Restaurant to the ever-enchanting Spring Prelude indoor garden.

Rock by rock, the garden beds are laid out. Fountains and ponds are carefully made, while bridges, fences and patios are assembled. Hundreds of trees, shrubs and essential ferns are put in their place. Tropical plants create a jungle; truckloads of bark mulch are brought in by wheelbarrow before the bounty of spring flowers are planted in mass. This is The Spring Prelude. And it is all installed in one week.

Truth be told, work is done on this project months in advance. Masterly planned and implemented, the preparation of props and plants streamline the entire installation making for a successful show of Eden. Spring bulbs are potted up and urged into bloom in warmer greenhouses, trees and shrubs are brought in from the outdoors to acclimatize slowly beforehand in carefully controlled heat. Plants are cleaned and props are mocked up for a dry run.

Meanwhile in the great outdoors, new signs of flowering action can be found in The Gardens. Galanthus nivalis, (Snowdrop) brighten up little spots here and there. Crocus magically appears in a colourful blanket in the Rose Garden. Garrya elliptica (Silk-tassel bush) is interesting with its pendent gray-green catkins, many which are found in containers as well as flower beds in the garden.

It won’t be long now. The garden is set to ignite…all we have to do is watch.

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:

  • Anthurium (Flamingo flower)
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
  • Callicarpa (Beautyberry)
  • Camellia
  • Catalpa (Indian bean tree)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Crocus
  • Cyclamen
  • Davidia (Dove tree)
  • Erica (Heather)
  • Euphorbia pulcherrina (Poinsettia)
  • Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop)
  • Garrya elliptica (Silk- tassel bush)
  • Hamamelis (Witch hazel)
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Hydrangea
  • Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
  • Kalanchoe
  • Jasminium nudiflorum (Winter jasmine)
  • Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
  • Medinilla magnifica
  • Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Orchid
  • Pansy
  • Pieris (Lily -of - the valley shrub)
  • Polyanthus (Primula)
  • Pyracantha
  • Sarcococca (Christmas box)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Viburnum x bodnantense
  • Viburnum tinus
  • Viola
 
The Butchart Chronicles : January 4, 2018

Spring Prelude Indoor Garden - A Winter Delight

Our Spring Prelude indoor garden display is back for another glorious run from January 15th through March 15th. Established in 1999, the Spring Prelude Garden has evolved into a world-class indoor floral display.

Join us as we fast forward the seasons to enjoy a glimpse of spring

The indoor Spring Prelude garden was created to provide our visitors with a colourful and intimate indoor garden experience during the shorter days of winter. This also provides you with a small taste of what you can expect to experience once the outdoor garden comes alive in the spring. 

Although colour plays a large part in the makeup of the display, perhaps the most striking features of this garden are the original water features and sculpture produced by our very talented and creative staff.

Each year the features change as the designers collaborate and experiment with various elements which can be incorporated into the display.

The display generally focuses on plants you would find outdoors in your garden in the spring time, but probably the most talked about plants are the many varieties of orchids. These beautiful plants are scattered throughout the garden, creating a romantic scene.

There are a few different themes in our Spring Prelude ranging from tropical borders accented with orchids to a temperate area which features an amazing range of plant material forced into bloom. The display also features an intimate Asian-themed courtyard centered on a dazzling water wall as well as a garden area designed specifically for wedding ceremonies.

The Spring Prelude display provides waves and layers of colour, intoxicating fragrance and the sounds and movement of water all together in the intimacy of a cleverly crafted indoor garden.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : December 21, 2017

Flower and Garden Report December 22nd - January 6th

Flower and Garden Report December 22nd– January 6th, 2018

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Poplar trees, planted by Jennie Butchart herself, illuminated in the night sky (right)
Photo credit: Andrea Varju

Dashing through The Gardens at Christmas is like a surreal dream. Thousands of colourful lights lead the way through the meandering paths, lighting up the festive décor and showcasing the jewels of The Gardens: the trees.

Jennie Butchart had artistic vision and determination. Garden by garden, always thinking ahead, Jennie knew the fundamentals were critical. Trees were carefully selected and many were planted by Jennie herself. Significant to the historic garden, these trees are the pillars of her legacy.

Western red cedars leading up to the Sunken Garden

The Christmas night walk offers an incredible opportunity to view these garden icons in a whole new light. Just before you reach the Sunken Garden lookout you will walk amongst a grove of Thuja plicata (Western red cedar) sparkling with delicate lights. At the lookout, the magic comes alive with passion and excitement. The colourful lights bring the garden to life. Expert eyes of the lighting design crew have highlighted the beauty of the many trees and shrubs. Acer palmatum dissectum (Japanese maple) has such incredible structure; during the winter months it is striking in its barren state. Many fine specimens can be found here in The Gardens.

At the Ross Fountain, prepare to be mesmerized with the mystical lights encircled by the forest. Completely awe-inspiring are the six Populas italica nigra (Lombardy polar) planted by Jennie Butchart herself over 100 years ago. Far exceeding the average 80-year life expectancy, these Poplars are perhaps the most well maintained of all time! Further up the path, twinkling lights encased in grapevine balls in the native Acer macrophylla (Big leaf maple) and Davidia involucrata (Dove tree) elegantly filter through the trees.

On the Concert Lawn, you will find several Julgans regia (English walnut) trees cloaked in classic white lights. A prelude to the Seven Swans and the enchanting forest that lies beyond in the distance. The Eight Maids are in The Orchard. These venerable fruit trees include Malus domestica ‘Gravestein’ and ‘King Edward VII’ (Apple) as well as Pyrus (Pear).

The English walnut trees on the Concert Lawn cloaked in white lights (right)

During the daytime hours, you will find many other things to peak your interest. The Butchart Gardens is truly one of the world’s most beautiful places. As the year comes to a close we look forward to the New Year and reflect on the beauty of life in Jennie’s garden.

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:

  • Anthurium (Flamingo flower)
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
  • Callicarpa (Beautyberry)
  • Camellia
  • Catalpa (Indian bean tree)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Cyclamen
  • Davidia (Dove tree)
  • Erica (Heather)
  • Euphorbia pulcherrina (Poinsettia)
  • Garrya elliptica (Silk- tassel bush)
  • Hamamelis (Witch hazel)
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Hydrangea
  • Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
  • Kalanchoe
  • Jasminium nudiflorum (Winter jasmine)
  • Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
  • Medinilla magnifica
  • Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Orchid
  • Pansy
  • Pieris (Lily-of-the valley shrub)
  • Polyanthus (Primula)
  • Pyracantha
  • Sarcococca (Christmas box)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Viburnum x bodnantense
  • Viburnum tinus
  • Viola
 
The Butchart Chronicles : December 15, 2017

Flower and Garden Report December 15th - 21st 2017

Flower and Garden Report December 15th - 21st 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

A Holly display in the Rose Garden, Cedar boughs in the background

The Gardens are all decked out with Cedar boughs and Holly; the magic of Christmas fills the air. Still one more week until winter officially arrives bringing the most restful time in the garden. It is the time when everything is put in place and protected against the unknown elements of winter - whether it will be a mild one this year or bracing for a series of intense winter storms, we will be ready.

The gardeners are far from restful. The massive cleanup from the fall can seem endless at times but the end is near… just in time to brace for winter storms! Behind the scenes the greenhouse staff is busy propagating plants, preparing plants for the Spring Prelude (pictured below), pruning back tender shrubs and keeping our cycle of plant life on schedule. The arborist crew carefully monitor the significant tree collection for signs of damage and take preventative measures in the care and preservation of the renowned arboretum.

The Spring Prelude garden, open January 15th - March 15th every year

A true sign of winter is the first blossoms of Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Jelena’ (Witch hazel) which have revealed themselves this week. Fragrant, spider-shaped flowers in coppery orange are a true winter garden classic. Many are located throughout the grounds but it is the ones on the Concert border that are the first to bloom.

Watching for blossoms to emerge in the garden is always exciting, but patience is needed. This is the time to enjoy the canvas laid out before us and let our imagination take hold.

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:

  • Anthurium (Flamingo flower)
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
  • Callicarpa (Beautyberry)
  • Camellia
  • Catalpa (Indian bean tree)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Cyclamen
  • Davidia (Dove tree)
  • Erica (Heather)
  • Euphorbia pulcherrina (Poinsettia)
  • Garrya elliptica (Silk- tassel bush)
  • Hamamelis (Witch hazel)
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Hydrangea
  • Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
  • Kalanchoe
  • Jasminium nudiflorum (Winter jasmine)
  • Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
  • Medinilla magnifica
  • Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Orchid
  • Pansy
  • Pieris (Lily-of-the valley shrub)
  • Polyanthus (Primula)
  • Pyracantha
  • Sarcococca (Christmas box)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Viburnum x bodnantense
  • Viburnum tinus
  • Viola

Poinsettia display in the photo window

 
The Butchart Chronicles : December 8, 2017

Flower and Garden Report December 8th - 14th

Flower and Garden Report December 8th -14th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

It’s a wonderful life in the garden. A sanctuary for many local birds, it is the place to be for bird enthusiasts. The beautiful sounds of singing birds bring a peaceful feeling amidst the historic garden. Around 35 common birds are seen regularly at The Gardens, from Anna’s hummingbirds and Song sparrows to soaring Bald eagles. Some birds show themselves in the winter, others will be back to join us in the spring.

The December garden delivers many delights. Hardy blossoms surprise the plant lovers; pretty Helleborus (Christmas rose) brighten up winter containers, Erica (Heather), soft yellow Jasminium (Winter jasmine) and delicate Camellia blossoms are just some of the flowering jewels found in The Gardens. Established older trees covered in lichen and moss capture the essence of the well-established garden, while the Christmas display brings joy to all those who come.

Sunny days and crisp starry nights lie in the days ahead, making the garden an ideal place for wintery walks. One of my favorite times of the day during December is late afternoon, as the sun sets over the hills on the west side of The Garden casting a gorgeous glow, signaling the end of another beautiful day. As the night falls, the magic begins.

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest

  • Anthurium (Flamingo flower)
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
  • Callicarpa (Beautyberry)
  • Camellia
  • Catalpa (Indian bean tree)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Cyclamen
  • Davidia (Dove tree)
  • Erica (Heather)
  • Euonymus europaeus (Spindle tree)
  • Euphorbia pulcherrina (Poinsettia)
  • Garrya elliptica (Silk- tassel bush)
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Hydrangea
  • Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
  • Kalanchoe
  • Jasminium nudiflorum (Winter jasmine)
  • Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
  • Medinilla magnifica
  • Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Orchid
  • Pansy
  • Pieris (Lily -of - the valley shrub)
  • Polyanthus (Primula)
  • Pyracantha
  • Sarcococca (Christmas box)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Viburnum x bodnantense
  • Viburnum tinus
  • Viola

 
The Butchart Chronicles : December 1, 2017

Flower and Garden Report December 1st - 7th

Flower and Garden Report December 1st - 7th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Just like magic, it is Christmas. Thousands of bulbs sparkle and shine as The Gardens are lit up for the festive season. Cedar boughs line the pathways leading the way through the Twelve Days of Christmas walk. Oh, what fun it is!

Christmas classics with a twist instill a festive ambience. Variegated Ilex (Holly) and the scent of Pine are prevalent in The Gardens. Creative winter arrangements flowing with mixed greenery and berries can be found outdoors in cement urns, while approximately 2,200 Poinsettias fill the indoor displays in traditional reds, winter whites and soft pinks.

With all the glitz of Christmas in the air, it is easy to miss the little things that are happening out in the garden. Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ is in full bloom in The Sequoia Grove, very early colour is about to be revealed amongst our early blooming Rhododendrons. Camellia japonica ‘Kanji’ with its pretty pink single flower has begun to bloom.

It’s all up to Mother Nature now. Mild weather can speed things along or a cold snap can come along and shut down any plans for early bloomers.

The gardening staff have been very busy mulching the Roses, raking leaves and protecting tender plants that are left in the garden all winter. Newly rooted cuttings are potted up in the greenhouses and preparations for the next chapter at The Gardens (Spring Prelude) are fully underway. It seems there is always garden momentum, which is a good thing. It is what keeps the passion for the beloved Butchart Gardens alive. 

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest

  • Anthurium (Flamingo flower)
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
  • Callicarpa (Beautyberry)
  • Camellia
  • Catalpa (Indian bean tree)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Cyclamen
  • Davidia (Dove tree)
  • Erica (Heather)
  • Euonymus europaeus (Spindle tree)
  • Euphorbia pulcherrina (Poinsettia)
  • Garrya elliptica (Silk- tassel bush)
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Hydrangea
  • Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
  • Kalanchoe
  • Jasminium nudiflorum (Winter jasmine)
  • Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
  • Medinilla magnifica
  • Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Orchid
  • Pansy
  • Pieris (Lily-of-the valley shrub)
  • Polyanthus (Primula)
  • Pyracantha
  • Sarcococca (Christmas box)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Viburnum x bodnantense
  • Viburnum tinus
  • Viola
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