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The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

New Arrivals at the Seed and Gift Store

Two Canadian Products You Won't Want to Miss at The Seed and Gift Store and Gallery

The Seed and Gift Store, and corresponding seasonal Gallery, are always sourcing exciting new products to showcase and sell in their stores.

This season, we would like to turn your attention to two Canadian brands that our new to The Butchart Gardens.

1. Wild Coast Perfumery

These all-natural perfumes feature scents named after various west coast locations. Each of these scents is inspired by the smell and essence of that location. For example, Tofino perfume features sweet and citrusy blended with wild rose, Western Red Cedar and Juniper -- a reflection of the collection of smells one might experience during an adventure in Tofino.

These products do not contain synthetics, petrochemicals, artificial fragrance oils, dyes, parabens, phthalates or chemicals of any kind.


Fun fact: a member of the Gift Store staff suffers from asthma and is typically very sensitive to perfumed products. She has not experienced any issues in the presence of these perfumes.

You will find Wild Coast Perfumery products in the Gallery because these products are created right here on the island.

2. Fire and Ice Canadian Diamonds

Treat yourself or a loved one to an original Canadian diamond. Choose a stunning bracelet, unique necklace or glistening earrings. These are truly Canadian products with diamonds mines located throughout Canada in Northwest Territories, Ontario and Quebec and the jewellery 100% designed and handcrafted in Ontario.


Each Maple Leaf Collection item sold at The Seed and Gift Store includes a certificate of origin, leatherette passport and matching box.

Please note: Fire and Ice Diamond products are currently not available in our online store so we encourage you to visit.

We hope you have the chance see these items for yourself this season at The Gardens.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

Annual 12 Month Passholder Shopping Event

Annual 12 Month Pass Holder Holiday Shopping Event

November 23rd, 2017

3:30pm - 7:00pm

Do you have a 12 Month Pass? Join us for the annual shopping event reserved just for you!

Bring a friend! (due to limited capacity, only 1 guest per cardholder). Your guest also receives the 12 Month Pass Holder’s 10% discount on this special evening

This event will give you a head start on your holiday shopping with a great selection of merchandise and accessories.

Here are a few things to look forward to at this year's event:

  • Delta Ocean Pointe Resort and Spa will be offering complimentary hand massages
  • Representatives from some of our local product lines such as Queen Bee Farms
  • Local artist Richard Shaw
  • Wild Coast Perfumery will be sampling their products
  • Great door prizes
  • Tasty food sampling created by our culinary team

Door prizes include:

  • Wood bird carving by Richard Shaw
  • Queen Bee Farms gift basket
  • $25 Spa gift certificate
  • Sid Dickens memory tile
  • Wild Coast Whistler 15ml perfume
  • Natural Accent cutting boards
  • Christmas Cactus from our gardening department
  • 12 month pass

Light refreshments will be available for purchase in The Coffee Shop which remains open until 7pm.

The Visitor Information Centre will remain open for those who need to renew of their 12 Month Pass, and of course, for those wishing to purchase a pass.

Please note: Each 12 Month Pass holder must arrive with their guest after 3:30pm and before 7pm.

The floral gardens will be closed for viewing at 3:30pm. The entrance gate will close at 7pm.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

Chef's Corner

Learn How to Make Cauliflower Camembert Bisque

Meals are all about bringing family and friends together in a delicious way. Our culinary team is pleased when a dish is so well recieved, it inspires them to share the recipe so you can try it at home. This soup was featured on both the summer lunch and dinner menus in the Dining Room Restaurant

Try the recipe for: Cauliflower Camembert Bisque

"A bowl of hearty flavour to warm up on a cool autumn day"
"Velvety and smooth"
"Delicious and full of flavor"

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The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

2017 Magic of Christmas Dinner & Dance

Gather your friends or colleagues for the annual festive Magic of Christmas Dinner and Dance at The Butchart Gardens.

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UPDATE, October 25th: This event is nearly sold out. To reserve the last seats, please call 250-652-4422 ext. 320

We invite you to ring in the Christmas season with a night of festivities at The Butchart Gardens.

This adult-oriented event features festive food, dancing, live music, cash bar service and your exclusive viewing of the Magic of Christmas display. It is the perfect setting for a Christmas party with your friends or colleagues.

Feast on a delicious buffet dinner prepared by our culinary experts while you relax and listen to live music. Our chefs have planned a palate-pleasing menu that is set to impress.

Click here to view the menu.

After dinner, our Carollers will lead you for a traditional stroll through The Gardens, to enjoy the sights and sounds of the season. Your exclusive preview of our annual Christmas lights display as they transform The Gardens into a festive wonderland will be sure to put you in the holiday spirit.

To complete the evening, return to The Blue Poppy Restaurant to indulge in a selection of sumptuous desserts, then dance to fabulous live music with The Chris Millington Band.

EVENT DETAILS

This event is Saturday November 25th - 6:30pm to 11:30pm.

  • $99 per person + tax. Price includes exclusive access to The Gardens and gratuities.
  • Reservations are required. We recommend reserving soon to secure a spot for your group as the event will sell out fast!
View the menu

Contact: Group Services (8:30am-5:00pm)
250-652-4422 ext 320


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The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

Summer 2017: A Season in Review

Highlights from Summer 2017

A season in review

It's hard to believe that the long hot days of summer are beginning to get shorter and the nights longer and cooler. While we are sad to say goodbye to the sunny summer months, we are also very much looking forward to everything that autumn brings. From vibrant fall foliage and seasonal blooms to cozy sweaters and warm drinks.

Before we jump into autumn, let's take a look back at some of the highlights from summer 2017.

1. An Amazing Summer Concert Series

There were over 60 consecutive performances this summer by bands from all across Canada. Every night hundreds, and sometimes thousands, of visitors gathered on the Concert Lawn to enjoy the evening entertainment. The Ricky Skaggs special event on August 16th attracted a lively bluegrass audience from near and far. The annual Victoria Symphony performance, lead by Tania Miller, was a huge hit with their melodies filling The Gardens with delight. Thank you to all the performers and visitors who joined us for Spectacular Summer Evenings.

2. Water Stations in Full Effect


As you may know, on World Water Day this past March, The Butchart Gardens implemented "Banning the Bottle". In other words, from March 22nd onward, we no longer sell single-use plastic water bottles. This move will eliminate 80,000 single-use plastic water bottles each year from the environment. Visitors supported this movement by bringing their own reusable bottles to fill up an any of the water stations located throughout The Gardens.

Tip for pet owners: many of these water stations also have a mini water station for your four-legged friend(s).

3. Canada 150 Presence

2017 is a big year for Canada. Locals and visitors alike are partaking in celebrations and activities throughout the year to recognize Canada's 150th anniversary. Our gardening department has kept this theme in mind with many of their beds and borders through the spring and summer months. In addition, on the Fireworks Lawn, there has been a giant '150' with an infinity symbol made with seasonal flowers since spring. It started by bursting into bloom with hundreds of red and white tulips that were later replaced with begonias.

In addition to our 150 themed plantings, Harbour Air's Canada 150 float plane made regular appearances in Butchart Cove.

4. Named a Top 10 Attraction in Canada by USA Today

USA Today opened up polls to its readers to vote on a number of "10 Top" categories. In the "Top 10 Attractions in Canada" category, The Butchart Gardens was listed among twenty destinations. Over the course of four weeks voters from all over the world voted daily for their favourites. In the end, The Butchart Gardens was named one of the top 10.

This summer brought visitors from around the globe and we look forward to welcoming more in the upcoming seasons. Stay up-to-date with events and current blooms by following Butchart Gardens on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 15, 2017

How to Prepare a Rose Garden for Winter

How to Prepare a Rose Garden for Winter

By John Hill, Rose Garden Supervisor

As the summer season winds down in the Rose Garden, the level of work required to maintain the roses also slows down. Let the six Butchart Rose Garden tasks serve as tips for your own roses.

1. Deadheading 101

Instead of deadheading (removing spent flowers) twice a week, we will continue to lightly deadhead them as needed, which typically will be once a week in mid-September until they no longer require any deadheading at all by mid-October. Reducing deadhead frequency gives the rose canes a chance to start to harden off for the winter.   

2. Fertilizing Patterns

All fertilizing of the roses stopped by the end of July in order to stop promoting new growth. As the days and nights begin to cool in September, the need to irrigate will be reduced from four days to two days each week. When we begin to receive sufficient rainfall, irrigation is eventually stopped altogether.

3. Potassium Sulfate Best Practices

Starting in late September we spray the roses with potassium sulfate on a weekly basis for three weeks in a row. This helps to accelerate the hardening off process of the roses for the winter. Since we started doing this a few years ago, I have found that we hardly have any black canes in the spring due to frost damage. We continue to monitor the roses for insect and disease throughout this season as well.

4. Cutting Back

At the end of October, or early November, we will cut down the roses in the foregrounds to about two feet tall and the roses in the backgrounds will be cut down to approximately four and a half feet. This will leave the plants at a uniform height for the winter and helps to prevent long canes from whipping around in the wind or breaking off from excessive snow loads.

5. Cleanup Secrets

At this time, we also remove all of the remaining leaves on the plants and clean up any debris or weeds from the garden one last time. Removing the leaves helps to remove any disease spores and cleans the garden up so we don’t have leaves blowing around in the winter. We do not compost these leaves; we either burn or bury them in our fill pile.     

6. Mulching for Protection

Once these tasks are completed, we mulch our Hybrid tea roses with a 50/50 mix of screened leaf mulch and screened woods chip mulch which we produce on site. The mulch is placed around the base of each rose to about ten inches high to help protect the crowns of the plants from frost damage. In early spring, about 75% of the mulch is removed with the remainder left behind to amend the soil.

With all of these tasks completed, the Rose garden can take a well-deserved rest for the winter.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 8, 2017

Flower and Garden Report September 8th - 14th, 2017

Flower and Garden Report September 8th – 14th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

There is a new vibe at The Gardens this week. Days are filled with sunshine and the September evening light brings a peaceful feeling. The pace has slowed down and it seems all the wonders of the garden have a lingering effect. With no end in sight to the endless beautiful flowers, it must be magic.

This is one of the best times to visit. Fabulous hanging baskets and container plantings look fresh and vibrant, flowing with nearly 200 different varieties including an incredible array of Fuchsia, unique Begonias and other complementary texture plants they are simply unparalleled. Meticulous maintenance ensures these showstoppers will carry on through September and into October.

In September the turf crew carries out the annual lawn maintenance, aerating the rolling green lawns of The Gardens. Meanwhile, our gardeners are busy planting flower beds with colorful Chrysanthemums, signaling fall is in the air. Fall flowering bulbs such as Colchium (Autumn crocus) and Schizostylis coccinea (Kaffir lily) are popping up around the garden with splashes of color. Many shrubs and trees are forming berries and interesting seed pods. In the Japanese Garden the bright orange–red berries of Arum italicum (Lords and ladies) bring interest to the quiet garden, while the Dahlia border gets bolder each day as it works up to its peak season.

Always evolving, The Gardens offer daily delights and never lack surprises!

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Achillea
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree)
  • Angelonia
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Antirrhinum (Snapdragon)
  • Arum italicum (Lords and ladies)
  • Aster ( Michaelmas daisy)
  • Begonia
  • Buddleja (Butterfly bush)
  • Cephalaria (Giant scabiosa)
  • Cereus ‘Queen of The Night’ (Night blooming cactus)
  • Chelone obliqua (Turtlehead)
  • Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum ugandense ( Blue glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum( Glory bower)
  • Clethra (Summersweet)
  • Colchium( Autumn crocus)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Crocosmia
  • Dahlia
  • Duranta  ‘Sapphire Showers’
  • Echinacea (Coneflower)
  • Fuchsia
  • Gladiolus callianthus
  • Helenium (Sneezeweed)
  • Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
  • Heptacodium miconioides ( Seven –son flower)
  • Hibiscus syriacus ‘Blue Bird’
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Lagerstroemeria (Crape myrtle)
  • Leonotis (Lion’s ear)
  • Lespedeza (Bush clover)
  • Lilium (Lily)
  • Lobelia speciosa
  • Manettia (Firecracker vine)
  • Persicaria (Knotweed)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
  • Schizostylis (Kaffir lily)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Tecoma
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Verbena
  • Vitex
  • Zauschneria ( California fuchsia)
  • Zinnia
 
The Butchart Chronicles : September 1, 2017

Flower and Garden Report September 1st - 7th, 2017

Flower and Garden Report September 1st  – 7th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Gardens are known for their secrets and The Butchart Gardens is no exception. Words and pictures cannot describe the immeasurable beauty of The Gardens. Visitors travel from all over the world just to visit the renowned floral display. This is a fact we can never take for granted and always work towards providing each and every visitor a memorable visit.

With so many flower beds filled with Heliotrope (Cherry pie plant), Begonias, Geraniums and Rudbeckia around every corner, it would appear that the gardeners have done their job for the season. The truth is, gardens of this magnitude need constant maintenance - endless deadheading, weeding and pruning are only part of what has been going on inside The Gardens.

Behind the scenes the greenhouse staff has been busy sowing seeds, pricking out, and potting up in preparation for the fall planting of our spring display. Our signature Myosotis (Forget-me–not), Bellis (English daisy), and Erysimum (Wallflower) are all grown from seed during the summer months and will be ready to plant in The Gardens later this fall when our bulbs arrive from Holland. Poinsettias are also being grown in our greenhouses for the Christmas indoor displays. The garden designers have been out and about bed planning for next summer. This is an ideal time to reflect on the flower combinations and make careful decisions for the summer display for 2018.

One garden which visitors can only catch a glimpse of is the Cut Garden. Located on the left side as you exit The Gardens in your vehicle, you will notice an area with rows of colorful flowers. This is where the floral design duo head out early in the morning to pick several buckets of fresh flowers to create the beautiful floral arrangements at The Gardens. With an abundance of flowers to choose from (this week’s pick include Delphiniums, Zinnia, Helianthus, Rudbeckia, Antirrhinum and Roses) it is like being a kid in a candy store! These arrangements are displayed in the Dining Room Restaurant in the historic Butchart residence, reminiscent of the days when Jennie Butchart herself filled the residence with gorgeous bouquets from her garden.

This week visitors are treated to a spectacular floral display. The Dahlia border is laden with glorious blossoms. With nearly 700 plants and over 100 different varieties in 11 different forms and colors, it’s hard to believe the best of the Dahlia season is yet to come!

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Achillea
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree)
  • Angelonia
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Antirrhinum (Snapdragon)
  • Aster ( Michaelmas daisy)
  • Begonia
  • Buddleja (Butterfly bush)
  • Cephalaria (Giant scabiosa)
  • Cereus ‘Queen of The Night’ (Night blooming cactus)
  • Chelone obliqua (Turtlehead)
  • Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum ugandense ( Blue glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum( Glory bower)
  • Clethra (Summersweet)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Crocosmia
  • Dahlia
  • Duranta  ‘Sapphire Showers’
  • Echinacea (Coneflower)
  • Fuchsia
  • Gladiolus callianthus
  • Helenium (Sneezeweed)
  • Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
  • Heptacodium miconioides ( Seven –son flower)
  • Hibiscus  syriacus ‘Blue Bird’
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Lagerstroemeria (Crape myrtle)
  • Leonotis (Lion’s ear)
  • Lespedeza (Bush clover)
  • Lilium (Lily)
  • Lobelia speciosa
  • Manettia (Firecracker vine)
  • Persicaria (Knotweed)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Tecoma
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Verbena
  • Vitex
  • Zauschneria ( California fuchsia)
  • Zinnia
 
The Butchart Chronicles : August 25, 2017

Flower and Garden Report August 26th - September 1st 2017

Flower and Garden Report August 26th - September 1st

By Thea Hegland

A visit to The Butchart Gardens is like a treasure hunt. You never know what you will find. As flowers come and go, there are always unexpected delights.

With the last week of August suddenly upon us, there is no end to the plethora of blossoms. It seems to get better with each week that passes. While it is true some plants are getting perhaps a little tired after the hot summer, other plants are just coming into their prime. The late summer flowering trees and shrubs are making their presence in The Gardens known. Hibiscus syriacus (Rose of Sharon) is bursting with gorgeous blossoms. While it looks like a tender, exotic flower, this particular one is actually rather hardy. Clerodendrum trichotomum, Clethra alnifolia (Summersweet) and Heptacodium miconioides (Seven – son flower) fill the garden air with fragrance.

Hibiscus

Buried treasures are deep in the Sunken Garden. With bright orange Zinnia inca glowing boldly and Begonias spilling out of flower beds, you will have to look closely to find the flowers and plants that are less imposing. Off the beaten path by The Falls you will find Polygonum cuspidatum (Japanese knotweed, Mexican bamboo) in full bloom. While considered somewhat invasive, we are able to control this garden wonder. Walking along the Sunken Garden perennial border you will become very aware of the beautiful smell of Actaea simplex ‘Black Negligee’ (Bugbane) before you see it. Tall white arching racemes complement the dark purplish-brown foliage. Lost somewhere in the Sunken Garden Arisarum proboscideum (Mouse plant) can sometimes be found by fluke.

Our world-famous Rose Garden is still going strong. With nearly 300 different Roses, you can easily spend a delightful time admiring and smelling the Roses. With endless blossoms in so many different colors and shades, it is easy to feel inspired. Thinking of my 64-pack of Crayola Crayons I once treasured as young girl (Fuchsia, Magenta, Mulberry, and Carmine Red), imagine if there was a colouring book of The Gardens. Oh what a fun idea!

Truly a garden for all, The Butchart Gardens is a timeless classic. Whether you visit once in a lifetime or weekly, you will be glad you came.

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Achillea
  • Aconitum (Monkshood)
  • Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree)
  • Angelica
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Antirrhinum (Snapdragon)
  • Aster (Michaelmas daisy)
  • Begonia
  • Buddleja (Butterfly bush)
  • Cephalaria (Giant scabiosa)
  • Cereus ‘Queen of The Night’ (Night blooming cactus)
  • Chelone obliqua (Turtlehead)
  • Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum ugandense (Blue glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum (Glory bower)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Crocosmia
  • Dahlia
  • Duranta ‘Sapphire Showers’
  • Echinacea (Coneflower)
  • Fuchsia
  • Gladiolus callianthus
  • Helenium (Sneezeweed)
  • Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
  • Heptacodium miconioides (Seven –son flower)
  • Hibiscus  syriacus ‘Blue Bird’
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Inula
  • Lagerstroemeria (Crape myrtle)
  • Leonotis (Lion’s ear)
  • Lespedeza (Bush clover)
  • Lilium (Lily)
  • Lobelia speciosa
  • Persicaria (Knotweed)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Tecoma
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Thunbergia
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Verbena
  • Vitex
  • Zauschneria ( California fuchsia)
  • Zinnia

 
The Butchart Chronicles : August 19, 2017

Flower and Garden Report August 19th – 25th, 2017

Flower and Garden Report August 18th – 25th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Victoria is known for its beautiful gardens. Located on southern Vancouver Island, Victoria boasts a sub-Mediterranean climate and spectacular natural surroundings. Easily accessible from the mainland, Victoria is a top destination city. While on the island, a visit to The Butchart Gardens is an absolute must see. Ideal growing conditions have enabled the Gardens to push the boundaries beyond the mainstream plants for Zone 8 and have boldly ventured into Zone 9.

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The Mediterranean Garden is an exceptional example of gardening on the edge. Originally planted about 15 years ago this garden has become one of the best kept secrets of The Butchart Gardens. Trees and shrubs have finally been established and trial and error have brought the reward of a magnificent garden. Many of the plants you see here are only marginally hardy for our climatic zone and would never get the chance to do anything exceptional unless the right micro-climate is nurtured. Creative measures are taken to provide a variety of plants from around the world; sub- tropical plants such as Musa (Banana), Colocasia(Taro), Iochroma cyanea ( Ornamental eggplant)are overwintered in our greenhouses before they are planted back in garden for the season.

Also gaining significance in The Gardens is the incredible succulent collection. From Aeonium arboretum to Echeveria they are being used more and more in mixed containers and flower beds. Be sure to check out the impressive succulent display as you enter The Gardens from the car parking lot. (the area around the benches on your right before the cross walk prior to the Coffee Shop/Gift Shop) It is truly a masterpiece!

Succulents.jpg

With so much to see at The Gardens this week you will be sure to have an enjoyable visit. Late summer brings a different feel to The Gardens. The colors are richer. Helianthus (Sunflower) with its warm tones in golden yellow and bronze are symbolic of late August. Soon the Dahlia border will dazzle and delight – you will just have to come back!

dahlia.jpg

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom:

Abutilon (Flowering maple)
Achillea
Aconitum  (Monkshood)
Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree)
Angelica
Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
Antirrhinum (Snapdragon)
Aster ( Michaelmas daisy)
Begonia
Buddleja (Butterfly bush)
Cephalaria (Giant scabiosa)
Cereus ‘Queen of The Night’ (Night blooming cactus)
Chelone obliqua (Turtlehead)
Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)
Clerodendrum ugandense ( Blue glory bower)
Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
Crocosmia
Dahlia
Duranta  ‘Sapphire Showers’
Echinacea (Coneflower)
Eucryphia
Fuchsia
Gladiolus callianthus
Helenium (Sneezeweed)
Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
Hemerocallis (Daylily)
Heptacodium miconioides ( Seven –son flower)
Hibiscus  syriacus ‘Blue Bird’
Hydrangea
Iochroma
Inula
Lagerstroemeria (Crape myrtle)
Leonotis (Lion’s ear)
Lilium (Lily)
Lobelia speciosa
Lysimachia
Monarda (Bee balm)
Persicaria (Knotweed)
Punica (Pomegranate)
Rosa (Rose)
Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy, black-eyed-susans)
Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
Tecoma
Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
Thunbergia
Tibouchina (Glory bush)
Verbena
Vitex
Zinnia
Clerodendrum_ugandense_-_DSC_4823.JPG Clerodendrum ugandense
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