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The Butchart Chronicles : November 22, 2017

Children's Birthday Parties at The Butchart Gardens

Book a Birthday Party at The Butchart Gardens

Picture your child's birthday party without the heavy lifting. Let our planning team take care of the logistics and our culinary team cover the food prep.

Birthday party packages are great value, including:

  • Exclusive use of the Carousel Room for two hours
  • Unlimited carousel rides for the children
  • Children’s admission 
  • Children’s food
  • Birthday cake
  • One chaperone admission for every three children
  • A gift for each child

The Carousel Room (pictured below) is a private room where your party can play games and have the birthday celebration. It is ajoined to the room where the carousel itself is located so children are never far away.

How to book:

  • View the Birthday Party Package for further details
  • Then give our birthday party planner a call at 250-652-4422 ext. 320 or email groupres@butchartgardens.com
 
The Butchart Chronicles : November 22, 2017

Fresh Finds at The Seed and Gift Store

Fresh Finds at The Seed and Gift Store

Two gift ideas for the holiday season

Christmas is coming! That means shopping for your loved ones. If you're searching for unique gifts, consider our Seed and Gift Store. These two products provide West Coast flare and are a great addition to any home.

1. Thymes "Fraser Fir" and "Pine Needle" Scented Candles

Bring the fresh scents of the forest into your home with these quality candles. The crisp fragrances make thoughtful gifts, or treat yourself.

2. Driftwood Vases


These beautiful vases are a great way to showcase your favourite house plant(s). Each vase is unique, featuring handblown glass and teak wood. Choose from different sizes and shapes in store.

Visit our Seed and Gift Store either online or in person to get a head start on your Christmas shopping.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : November 17, 2017

Flower and Garden Report November 18th - 24th

Flower and Garden Report November 18th – 24th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

It’s berry season at The Gardens! This week there are many garden wonders to marvel. Fall favorite, Callicarpa with tiny bead like purple berries brings vibrant colour to the November garden. Clerondendron trichotomum is striking with bright blue berries and pinkish-red calyces. A garden must have, Euonymus europaeus (Spindle tree) steals the show with spherical, four-lobed, clustered red fruit surrounding orange seeds.

Other shrubs such as Skimmia, (Japanese skimmia), Viburnum, Cotoneaster, Aucuba, Nandina (Heavenly bamboo) and Ilex also have interesting berries. These shrubs are classic garden staples. They provide excellent structure and are highlights of a winter garden.

Capturing much deserved attention in the garden is Catalpa (Indian bean tree) with its bounty of pendent, golden bean-like seed pods. Almost as if they were expertly hung by the Christmas decorators! With three different specimens located on The Concert Lawn, these are not to be missed.

Viburnum x bodnantense with its heavenly scented rosy-pink flowers can found in The Sequoia Grove, while the alluring fragrance of Sarcococca follows you through the garden paths.

This week the gardeners are busy raking all the leaves that have fallen from our many trees, mulching the Roses and preparing the garden for winter. Greenhouse staff have been designing indoor plant displays for the Christmas season that are sure to impress.

Always evolving, always interesting, always worth a visit!

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:

  • Acer (Japanese maple)
  • Anthurium (Flamingo flower)
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Bergenia (Elephant’s ears)
  • Browallia (Amethyst viola)
  • Callicarpa (Beautyberry)
  • Catalpa (Indian bean tree)
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum (Glory bower)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Cyclamen coum
  • Davidia (Dove tree)
  • Decaisnea fargesii
  • Erica (Heather)
  • Euonymus europaeus (Spindle tree)
  • Garrya elliptica (Silk- tassel bush)
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Heptacodium (Seven – son flower)
  • Hydrangea
  • Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
  • Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ (Oregon grape)
  • Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Orchid
  • Pansy
  • Parthenocissus tricuspidata (Boston ivy)
  • Polyanthus (Primula)
  • Pyracantha
  • Sarcococca (Christmas box)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Viburnum x bodnantense
  • Viburnum tinus
  • Viola
 
The Butchart Chronicles : November 9, 2017

Flower and Garden Report November 11th - 17th, 2017

Flower and Garden Report November 11th – 17th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

November frost has hit the garden. While we have been enjoying some crisp mornings, many days have been filled with sunshine and the daytime temperature has been pleasant. I like this time of the year in the garden.

The perennial borders have all been cut down, tender plants and shrubs are nestled safely in our greenhouses, and the bulbs are all freshly planted. Everything is in place for the winter months. This is the time of year when we can appreciate the landscape of The Gardens and observe the little surprises more closely that are waiting to be found.

Fabulous winter containers are replacing the summer ones with interesting shrubs and delicate flowers, including an extensive variety of evergreens with different textures and colours from Juniperus, Cryptomeria to Osmanthus.

With Remembrance Day this week we take the time to reflect on those who sacrificed their lives for our country as well as the many who have served and continue to serve.  The Butchart men served their country while The Gardens suffered a severe man power shortage. As a result, The Gardens were somewhat neglected.

In 1917 during the 1St World War Mr. R.P. Butchart was invited through the Imperial Munitions Board to assume Director of Shipbuilding on the west coast. This was to organize and build wooden ships for the war effort. Without hesitation, Mr. Butchart accepted the post. Jennie Butchart, always the gracious host, served tea while soldiers were being entertained on the main lawn during the 1st World War.

During the 2nd World War, the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Butchart was in the Naval Service. Lieutenant -Commander Robert Ian Ross served in the North Atlantic.

A beautiful floral wreath in commemoration of Remembrance Day will be on display for visitors. Arranged with care and consideration by our floral designer with classic red Roses.

Lest we forget

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:

  • Acer (Japanese maple)
  • Anthurium (Flamingo flower)
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Browallia (Amethyst violet)
  • Callicarpa (Beautyberry)
  • Catalpa (Indian bean tree)
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum (Glory bower)
  • Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’ (Dogwood)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Cyclamen coum
  • Davidia (Dove tree)
  • Euonymus europaeus (Spindle tree)
  • Helleborus (Christmas rose)
  • Fuchsia
  • Heptacodium (Seven – son flower)
  • Hydrangea
  • Ilex
  • Nandina (Heavenly bamboo)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Orchid
  • Pansy
  • Parthenocissus tricuspidata (Boston ivy)
  • Parrotia (Ironwood)
  • Polyanthus (Primula)
  • Pyracantha
  • Sedum (Stonecrop)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Viburnum
  • Viola
 
The Butchart Chronicles : November 3, 2017

Flower and Garden Report November 4th - 10th

Flower and Garden Report November 4th – 10th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

The weather has been unseasonably warm with sun drenched days. The final days of the Dahlia display went out in grand style; the radiant leaves on the Japanese maple trees have lingered a little longer.

These gorgeous days have been a welcome gift as the gardeners are nearing completion of the fall planting season. Hundreds of thousands of bulbs and plants have replaced the summer annual beds. Now the task of preparing the Roses for winter begins. From pruning, plucking off all the leaves by hand, (yes, all the leaves by hand) and mulching, the Rose Garden is in very good hands under the watchful eye of our Rose expert.

Recently, The Gardens earned the honour of being named “World Tulip Garden of The Year” by The World Tulip Society. This recognition is something we are very proud to have achieved. With all the Tulip bulbs that have been planted these past few weeks, it keeps us focused on the rewards of our hard work!

 As the gardens are laid to rest for the season other little things begin to peak some interest. Dangling like jewels from the Davidia tree on The Top Walk, pendent fruit attracts.

Pretty flowers on the hardy Fuchsia shrubs are an early November standout; Hydrangea flowerheads are beautiful as the cooler weather intensifies the colours. The former residence of The Butchart Family is covered in splendour with the Parthenocissus tricuspidata (Boston ivy) turning shades of brilliant red to purple.

With the Plant Identification Centre retiring for the season, the gardening staff will be offering tours of our greenhouses during the month of November (currently sold out). These tours are very popular and have filled up quickly. With some first-come, first-served spaces still available on Saturdays and Sundays, I encourage those wanting to get a rare glimpse of behind the scenes to arrive early in the morning, and get your name on the list.

Come for a visit, walk amongst the falling leaves and stay for the sumptuous Afternoon Tea – the fire inside is inviting and warm!

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:

  • Abelia
  • Acer (Japanese maple)
  • Anthurium (Flamingo flower)
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Callicarpa (Beautyberry)
  • Catalpa (Indian bean tree)
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum (Glory bower)
  • Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’ (Dogwood)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Cyclamen coum
  • Davidia (Dove tree)
  • Euonymus europaeus (Spindle tree)
  • Fuchsia
  • Gordlinia x grandiflora (Mountain Gordlinia)
  • Heptacodium (Seven – son flower)
  • Hydrangea
  • Ilex
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Pansy
  • Parthenocissus tricuspidata (Boston ivy)
  • Parrotia (Ironwood)
  • Pennisetum setaceum (Purple fountain grass)
  • Polyanthus (Primula)
  • Pyracantha
  • Sedum (Stonecrop)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Tricyrtis (Toad lily)
  • Viola

 
The Butchart Chronicles : October 27, 2017

What's New for Christmas This Year?

What’s New for Christmas This Year?

Discover what's being updated for the 2017 Magic of Christmas Display

By Bruce Watson, Director of Arts and Entertaintment

"What's new for Christmas this year?" I often hear this question at this time of year, but from my perspective the Christmas Display is constantly changing. One of our challenges each year is taking our existing Christmas effects and laying them out on the evolving organic canvas that is The Gardens. Shrubs grow, outgrow, or overgrow the effects they sheltered the year before. Trees are removed, or flowerbeds altered, and these changes force us to adapt the show each time we install it. The very nature of The Gardens ensures that that which is the same is never the same.

In addition to our altered landscape we also face the effects of time. Owing to the outdoor nature of our display, Christmas lights, props, and décor are subject to rapid aging in the winter elements and require continual maintenance simply to look like they did the year before. In the Arts & Entertainment department, we are constantly working on refurbishing the Christmas display, shoehorning in tasks throughout the year amongst our work on fireworks, concerts, or garden lighting. We think nothing of attending to a Christmas project, decked out in our shorts in the heat of the summer. For us, Christmas is omnipresent.

One of our big maintenance projects this year was to repair and replace many of the costumes on the “11 Pipers Piping” display. Fabric suffers in the damp conditions of the west coast winter, and after more than a decade out in the elements, the costumes had gathered dirt, worn out where in contact with the regular movement of the marionette strings, and had faded in the (albeit limited) UV light. It was time for the Pipers to refresh their wardrobe.

Some costumes were deemed salvageable and could be repaired, but many had to be replaced. We opted to match the replacements to the original designs as much as possible. Patterns no longer existed from the original construction, so our costumer gathered up the original costumes as templates, took them away for a rebuild, and went fabric shopping. This summer she returned with the re-creations and we roused the Pipers from their summer slumber and subjected them to an entire day of costume fittings.

We needed to make sure the new costumes were the correct size, see how they could be improved to better fit the Piper frames, and to select locations where the marionette strings that control the Piper movements would pass through the costumes, locations that would later be reinforced with grommets. The new costumes shine in comparison to the old costumes and the Pipers are eager to show off their new finery for you this holiday season.

Other “unseen” maintenance upgrades this year include continual repairs to the birds that personify so many of the 12 Days of Christmas, replacing and re-lighting the entire collection of worn-out vine balls, upgrades to the “Eight Maids a Milking” lighting control system, and the addition of LED colour changing lighting fixtures to the Dragon Fountain. Of course there will be new additions as well. New light displays will adorn the Concert Lawn and Rose Garden lawn, along with musical additions to The Gardens and a special display with a nod to Canada’s 150th anniversary.  

With autumn upon us, the Christmas installation is already well underway, the nine-week long installation as regular as the changing of the seasons. Yet, like each autumn season, it is both familiar but never exactly the same. I hope this year’s Christmas display offers you the chance to see something new, or simply brings a change in perspective to your visit.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : October 27, 2017

Flower and Garden Report October 28 - November 3rd

Flower and Garden Report October 28th – November 3rd, 2017

By Thea Hegland

It has been an intense week at The Gardens. Dramatic weather has brought heavy rainfall, wind and some respite. Moments of sunshine are soaked up before the next rainfall. With sun-filled days in the forecast ahead, this is a great time to take a walk through our autumn wonderland.

The gardeners are working to transform the gardens at a rapid pace. With no time to be idle, the pressure is on to plant the spring bulbs and remove tender plants before they succumb to a heavy frost. While the cool weather is critical to the autumn colour on the deciduous trees and shrubs, we must try to keep the garden pendulum balanced.

Highlights this week include the Dahlia border with over 180 different varieties, 11 different classes of Dahlias including Cactus, Waterlily, Decorative and Collarette forms, to name a few. Fabulous shapes and sizes provide our final kaleidoscope of colour before the garden takes a rest from all that glitters.

The autumn leaves shine bright on the trees, offering visitors an incredible experience. On the Concert Lawn, the Nyssa sylvatica (Tupelo) has turned a vivid orange. Nearby, the Parrotia persica (Ironwood) has some of the finest fall colour with orange, red, yellow and burgundy leaves. Some of the oldest trees in the gardens are at the entrance to the Japanese Garden. Two prominent Fagus sylvatica purpurea (European purple beech) were planted on either side of that garden entrance in 1906. The Japanese Garden is in its glory amongst the impressive collection of Japanese maples, some which are over 100 years old. Adiantum pedatum (Maidenhair fern) softly flow through the garden, creating a magical palate for flowing streams and reflecting ponds.

With endless garden pleasures, it is always a good time to come for a visit!

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest:

  • Abelia
  • Acer (Japanese maple)
  • Anthurium (Flamingo flower)
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Begonia
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Callicarpa (Beautyberry)
  • Celosia (Cockscomb)
  • Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum (Glory bower)
  • Colchium (Autumn crocus)
  • Cornuscontroversa ‘Variegata’ (Dogwood)
  • Cotoneaster
  • Cyclamen coum
  • Dahlia
  • Daphne
  • Eounymus alatus (Burning bush)
  • Euonymus europaeus (Spindle tree)
  • Fuchsia
  • Gordlinia x grandiflora (Mountain Gordlinia)
  • Heptacodium (Seven – son flower)
  • Hydrangea
  • Ilex
  • Nyssa (Tupelo)
  • Ophiopogon planiscapus (Black mondo grass)
  • Pansy
  • Parrotia (Ironwood)
  • Pennisetum setaceum (Purple fountain grass)
  • Polyanthus (Primula)
  • Pyracantha
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Sedum (Stonecrop)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Solanum
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Tricyrtis (Toad lily)

 
The Butchart Chronicles : October 19, 2017

Flower and Garden Report October 21st - 27th

Flower and Garden Report October 21st – 27th, 2017

By Thea Hegland

One of the greatest walks of a lifetime is here at The Butchart Gardens during autumn. Amongst the magical trees this historical garden is filled with tradition and timeless classics. The vision that Jennie Butchart had for the land which we roam is nothing short of astounding.

With two intense storms this past week bringing on rain and wind, The Gardens remain beautiful. And quiet. The looming grey sky captures the intensity of the autumn colours creating the most beautiful display of the season. Our world-class collection of Japanese maples is simply breathtaking. With many varieties of Acer palmatum including ‘Dissectum Atropurureum’, ‘Bloodgood’ and ‘Osakazuki’ it is easy to be taken by the wonder of it all.

The eagerly anticipated arrival of our spring bulbs is finally here. Now our 70 gardeners are working full steam ahead to plant the nearly 300,000 bulbs that will transform into the famous spring showcase. The summer display beds are being removed and perennial borders are being cut down for the season. All this work just cleans the space and highlights the beauty of the fall.

Plants, trees and shrubs that are blooming or of interest

  • Aconitum (Monkshood)
  • Acer (Japanese maple)
  • Aucuba japonica (Spotted laurel)
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Aralia elata (Japanese angelica tree)
  • Aster (Michaelmas daisy)
  • Begonia
  • Bellis (English daisy)
  • Callicarpa (Beautyberry)
  • Celosia (Cockscomb)
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Clerodendrumtrichotomum(Glory bower)
  • Colchium (Autumn crocus)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Cyclamen coum
  • Dahlia
  • Eounymus alatus (Burning bush)
  • Euonymus europaeus (Spindle tree)
  • Fuchsia
  • Gazania
  • Gordlinia x grandiflora (Mountain Gordlinia)
  • Helenium (Sneezeweed)
  • Heliopsis (Ox eye)
  • Heptacodium (Seven–son flower)
  • Hydrangea
  • Osteospermum (Cape daisy)
  • Pennisetumsetaceum (Purple fountain grass)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Polyanthus (Primula)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Schizostylis (Kaffir lily)
  • Sedum (Stonecrop)
  • Skimmia japonica
  • Solanum
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Tricyrtis (Toad lily)

 
The Butchart Chronicles : October 13, 2017

Flower and Garden Report October 13th - 20th

Garden Report October 13th - 20th, 2017

By Thea Hegland

The beauty of art and nature prevail. As the seasons evolve in The Gardens, changes in the flora at the end of the season offer some of the most incredible displays. Perhaps considered one of the best times to visit The Gardens by many, the autumn season boldly paints the garden palette with rich colours and falling leaves. Nestled amongst a picturesque green forest and rolling green lawns, our stunning tree collection is reaching its prime of the season.

Highlights encompass the remarkable collection of eloquent Japanese maples including, but not limited to, Acer japonicum ‘Aconitifolium’ and several varieties of Acer palmatum. The brilliant colours that these trees provide harmonize with the idyllic streams and ponds of The Gardens.

Our many other deciduous trees are also of interest at this time of the year. Cercidiphyllum japonicum (Katsura tree) and Liquidamber styraciflua (Sweetgum) prominently display their stunning fall colours. Simply at its best now is Heptacodium miconioides (Seven-son flower) with its showy rose coloured calyces. Considered a rare outstanding garden specimen, it captures the interest of plant enthusiasts.

Meanwhile our 70 gardeners are busy removing summer beds, planting Bellis (English daisy) and Myosotis (Forget- me -not) as we anxiously await our precious bulbs from overseas to arrive. Tender shrubs and plants are being returned to the safety of our greenhouses before the first frost.

Lingering flowers of summer can still be enjoyed. Framing the Rose Garden, a sea of bright pink ‘Queen Elizabeth’ Roses remains. While the Rose season is clearly fading, there are still some gorgeous Roses to enjoy!

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Achillea (Yarrow)
  • Aconitum (Monkshood)
  • Angelonia
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Aralia elata (Japanese angelica tree)
  • Arum italicum (Lords and ladies)
  • Aster (Michaelmas daisy)
  • Begonia
  • Callicarpa
  • Celosia (Cockscomb)
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum(Glory bower)
  • Colchium (Autumn crocus)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Cyclamen coum
  • Dahlia
  • Fuchsia
  • Gazania
  • Gordlinia x grandiflora (Mountain Gordlinia)
  • Helenium (Sneezeweed)
  • Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
  • Heliopsis (Ox eye)
  • Heptacodium miconioides (Seven –son flower)
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Justicia (Shrimp plant)
  • Lobelia speciosa
  • Manettia (Firecracker vine)
  • Osteospermum (Cape daisy)
  • Pennisetum setaceum (Purple fountain grass)
  • Penstemon (Bearded tonque)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Schizostylis (Kaffir lily)
  • Sedum (Stonecrop)
  • Solanum
  • Solidago (Goldenrod)
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Tricyrtis (Toad lily)
  • Verbena

 
The Butchart Chronicles : October 6, 2017

Flower and Garden Report October 6th - 12th

Flower and Garden Report October 6th - 12th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

It has been an incredible start to autumn here at The Gardens. Beautiful weather has filled the days with warmth and sunshine while the nights have become cool and crisp. Perfect conditions have set the stage for the radiant fall show; warm reds and golden tones of yellow glow throughout The Gardens with spectacular bursts of colour. Leading you through the peaceful garden paths is the canopy of magnificent deciduous trees.

Ornamental grasses accent borders and mixed container plantings. Hardy Fuchsias light up the flower beds with bold reds and royal purples. Attracting the eye, Euonymus europaeus (Spindle tree) is bearing ornamental red fruit with a pretty orange seed pod while the Euonymus alatus (Burning bush) has turned a brilliant red. Our renowned collection of Acer palmatum (Japanese maple) is revealing what autumn is all about at Butchart Gardens. Many of these Maples have graced The Gardens for over one hundred years.

As the days go by the colour in The Gardens intensifies. With Thanksgiving this weekend, it is the perfect time to come for a visit. Bring your friends or family and make a new tradition! From our gorgeous grounds surrounding the parking area to The Japanese Garden autumn colour delights with the Dahlias dazzling in between.

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Achillea (Yarrow)
  • Aconitum (Monkshood)
  • Angelonia
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Antirrhinum (Snapdragon)
  • Aralia cordata ‘Sun King’(Japanese spikenard)
  • Aralia elata (Japanese angelica tree)
  • Arum italicum (Lords and ladies)
  • Aster (Michaelmas daisy)
  • Begonia
  • Brugmansia (Angels’ trumpet)
  • Callicarpa
  • Canna (Indian shot)
  • Celosia (Cockscomb)
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum trichotomum(Glory bower)
  • Colchium (Autumn crocus)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Cyclamen coum
  • Dahlia
  • Fuchsia
  • Gazania
  • Gomphostigma virgatum (Otterbush)
  • Gordlinia x grandiflora (Mountain Gordlinia)
  • Helenium (Sneezeweed)
  • Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
  • Heliopsis (Ox eye)
  • Heptacodium miconioides (Seven –son flower)
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Justicia (Shrimp plant)
  • Leonotis (Lion’s ear)
  • Lespedeza (Bush clover)
  • Lobelia speciosa
  • Manettia (Firecracker vine)
  • Melastoma
  • Osteospermum (Cape daisy)
  • Pennisetum setaceum (Purple fountain grass)
  • Penstemon (Bearded tonque)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Schizostylis (Kaffir lily)
  • Sedum (Stonecrop)
  • Solanum
  • Solidago (Goldenrod)
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Tricyrtis (Toad lily)
  • Verbena
  • Vitex (Chaste tree)

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