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The Butchart Chronicles : August 11, 2017

Flower and Garden Report August 11th - 17th

Flower and Garden Report August 11th – 17th, 2017

By Thea Hegland

My mother used to bring me to The Gardens when I was a little girl. What I remember the most was how I felt when I was here. I was always very excited and felt special. It was like a fairy tale land amongst the pretty flowers and trees, magical streams and reflecting ponds. There were butterflies and dragonflies. There were birds and there was me... lost deep in my imagination in the enchanting Sunken Garden.

I know now I’m not the only one who feels this way about The Gardens. Memories are made and the moments are treasured. Colorful combinations of flowers harmonize with the trees and shrubs. Each season reveals more wonders and many visitors come back to enjoy The Gardens.

The warm mid-summer heat has brought out many new flowers in The Gardens this week. In our perennial borders you will find Helenium, Helianthus, Aster, Vernonia and Physostegia all coming into bloom now. The art of succession blooms in the perennial borders is imperative. Carefully selecting plants for their color, size, bloom time and artistically arranging them requires thought. The Concert Lawn perennial border is an endless flow classic favorites and unusual perennials. It is here you often find the butterflies, bees and hummingbirds among the flowers.

Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)

Often understated is the fern collection. Over 80 different ferns enhance The Gardens. Different species of Polystichum, Athyrium and Dryopteris soften the palette in a delicate way. There is a sense of calmness when you enter The Japanese Garden. Adiantum pedatum (Maidenhair fern) pleasantly flow through the peaceful garden. As you approach the bottom of the Japanese Garden you catch a glimpse of Butchart Cove. A highlight is to take advantage of the boat tours from the wharf. A beautiful scenic boat ride around Tod Inlet and Brentwood Bay offer a different perspective of The Gardens.

Another highlight this week is the Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree) blooming in the Japanese Garden. The soft fern-like leaves bear pretty fuzzy pink flowers. Two trees were planted in 1989 when the Japanese Garden had some garden renovation. Sadly we lost one this past winter during one of our snowfalls. While losing plants is a sad part of gardening, it always brings exciting change. Yet to be replaced, I look forward to new tree life in The Japanese Garden. I wonder what will be planted…

Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree)

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Achillea
  • Aconitum (Monkshood)
  • Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree)
  • Angelica
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Antirrhinum (Snapdragon)
  • Aster (Michaelmas daisy)
  • Astilbe
  • Astrantia (Masterwort)
  • Begonia
  • Buddleja (Butterfly bush)
  • Cephalaria (Giant scabiosa)
  • Cereus ‘Queen of The Night’ (Night blooming cactus)
  • Chelone obliqua (Turtlehead)
  • Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)
  • Clerodendrum ugandense ( Blue glory bower)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Crocosmia
  • Dahlia
  • Duranta  ‘Sapphire Showers’
  • Echinacea (Coneflower)
  • Eucryphia
  • Fuchsia
  • Gladiolus callianthus
  • Helenium (Sneezeweed)
  • Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
  • Hemerocallis (Daylily)
  • Hibiscus  syriacus ‘Blue Bird’
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Inula
  • Lagerstroemeria (Crape myrtle)
  • Leonotis (Lion’s ear)
  • Lilium (Lily)
  • Lobelia speciosa
  • Lysimachia
  • Monarda (Bee balm)
  • Persicaria (Knotweed)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Tecoma
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Thunbergia
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Verbena
  • Zinnia
 
The Butchart Chronicles : August 4, 2017

Flower and Garden Report August 4th - 10th 2017

Flower and Garden Report August 4th – 10th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

There is always a new plant mystery to solve in The Gardens. Interesting plants seem to suddenly appear and catch the eye. Perhaps they have been there for a while but are just starting to reveal something of interest. The good thing is I have developed excellent detective skills working here amongst the plants over the years. My colleagues in the gardening department contribute a wide range of expertise and when there is a plant mystery, well, we all tend to get a little excited!

The most unusual plant has come along and stumped me for a while. Recently acquired at The Gardens is Fuchsia paniculata. Unlike most Fuchsia plants this one is evergreen and the pink flowers resemble no Fuchsia I have ever seen. Its main attraction is the incredible blue/green ellipsoid berries. Located in pots just outside The Garden Gallery they are drawing interest from many plant enthusiasts. While this Fuchsia is interesting, we grow over 36 different varieties. Most impressive are the Fuchsia hanging baskets, which rival the spectacular Begonias in The Begonia Bower.

I often imagine how exciting a visit to Butchart Gardens is to the visitor who has never been here before. One tantalizing glimpse of The Sunken Garden lures you down. The endless flower beds are in full color; the remarkable trees that were once carefully selected have been established and gentle ferns softly accent the stunning garden. Truly a gardener’s garden, there are many complementary texture plantings.

The Bog Garden, for example, was once a struggling lawn. Sometimes it seems you just have to embrace what you have. As it is a very damp location of The Gardens, it soon became the ideal spot to create The Bog Garden. The large bold leaves of Petasites japonicus thrive in the shady damp conditions. They are highlighted by several different varieties of Hostas. Planted in masses, they make a dramatic impact, while the unusual Impatiens omeiana draws attention with its deep green with white variegated leaves.

I hope all visitors enjoy this very special place. Thank you for coming again and again!

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Achillea
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree)
  • Alocasia ( Elephant’s ear)
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Astilbe
  • Astrantia (Masterwort)
  • Begonia
  • Centaurea macrocephala (Giant knapweed)
  • Cereus ‘Queen of The Night’ ( Night blooming cactus)
  • Clerodendrum bungei (Glory bower)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Dahlia
  • Delphinium
  • Dierama (Angel’s fishing rod)
  • Duranta  ‘Sapphire Showers’
  • Eucryphia
  • Fuchsia
  • Gladiolus callianthus
  • Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
  • Hemerocallis (Daylily)
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Inula
  • Lagerstroemeria (Crape myrtle)
  • Leptospermum (Tea tree)
  • Lilium (Lily)
  • Lysimachia
  • Olearia (Daisy bush)
  • Optunia
  • Persicaria (Knotweed)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Tecoma
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Thermopsis villosa (Carolina lupine)
  • Thunbergia
  • Tibouchina (Glory bush)
  • Tradescantia
  • Zinnia
 
The Butchart Chronicles : July 31, 2017

Flower and Garden Report July 28th - August 3rd

Flower and Garden Report July 28th - August 3rd, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

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The Butchart Gardens is internationally renowned for its tree collection featuring a wide range of rare and iconic trees from around the world. These trees are fundamental to our garden ecosystem. They provide the framework for the glorious flower beds, shade and a natural habitat for the many birds here at The Gardens.

The gorgeous Koelreuteria paniculata (Golden-rain tree) glows on The Top Walk with its yellow fragrant flowers and stately Populus nigra italica (Lombardy poplar) line the exit path of The Sunken Garden. These trees have historical significance as Jennie Butchart planted them in 1910 to block the view of the imposing cement factory from the Sunken Garden lookout. They have been carefully maintained by our arborists and far exceed their expected lifespan.

On The Concert Lawn, several Julgans regia (English walnut) are gaining attention this week.  Planted circa 1920, these trees bear a green semi-flushy husk that protects the delicious walnut inside. As the walnuts ripen in the fall, they are a delightful treat to the many squirrels that make a home here at The Gardens.

While the trees here are most impressive, there are many other highlights this week. Truly a garden classic, the Hydrangea flowers in magnificent shades of blue, pinks and whites stand out in shady beds with their large flower heads.

With the warm summer days, the Mediterranean Garden is also thriving. Located within one of the warmest exposures on property, it is just coming into its glory now. The Olearia (Daisy bush), Anizgozanthus (Kangaroo paw), Punica (Pomegrante) and Lagerstroemia (Crape myrtle) are all rather striking. With so many unusual plants in The Mediterranean Garden, it is no wonder visitors come to The Plant Identification Centre with challenging questions!

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Acanthus spinosus ( Bear’s breeches)
  • Achillea
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Alocasia ( Elephant’s ear)
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Aruncus (Goat’s beard)
  • Astilbe
  • Astrantia (Masterwort)
  • Begonia
  • Catalpa bignonioides( Indian bean tree)
  • Centaurea macrocephala (Giant knapweed)
  • Cereus ‘Queen of The Night’ ( Night blooming cactus)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Dahlia
  • Delphinium
  • Dianthus (Pinks)
  • Dierama (Angel’s fishing rod)
  • Fuchsia
  • Helianthus (Perennial sunflower)
  • Hemerocallis (Daylily)
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Inula
  • Lagerstroemeria (Crape myrtle)
  • Lathyrus (Sweet pea)
  • Leptospermum (Tea tree)
  • Lilium (Lily)
  • Lysimachia
  • Olearia (Daisy bush)
  • Optunia
  • Persicaria (Knotweed)
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
  • Spartium junceum (Spanish broom)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Tecoma
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Thermopsis villosa (Carolina lupine)
  • Thunbergia
  • Tradescantia
  • Zinnia
 
The Butchart Chronicles : July 21, 2017

Flower and Garden Report July 20th - 27th, 2017

Flower and Garden Report July 20th - 27th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

One visit to The Butchart Gardens is all you will need to become enamored. The Gardens instill an atmosphere of inspiration. Jennie Butchart's artistic vision has gifted us a beloved jewel here on the Saanich Peninsula. It is very evident her legacy is everlasting; visitors travel from far and wide to experience the enchanting Gardens.

It's the little details that are considered that result in outstanding garden displays. Dedicated staff keep The Gardens meticulous, while carefully planned flower beds flow seamlessly throughout the property. Mature trees and shrubs provide significant framework and lush lawns offer quiet green space between the seemingly endless paths. 

With the long warm summer days we have finally been enjoying, the gardens are thriving. Flower beds are filled with colorful annuals that are in full bloom and the perennial borders are just peaking now. Each day there is something new to admire!

Deserving attention this week is our fine collection of Lilies. The soft pale peach color of Lilium ‘Saltarello’ simply stuns; Lilium superbum ‘Turkscap lily’ with its bright-orange, pendent, recurved flowers grace the many perennial borders.

The Italian Garden is an explosion of hot and spicy colors. Once a tennis court, this formal garden boasts dramatic flower beds filled with Rudbeckia, Tagetes, Lantana and Cuphea. The Cross Pond is surrounded by bright red Geraniums and a complementary Salvia farinacea is creating a pleasing focal point. I highly recommend indulging in a refreshing gelato from our Gelateria located right in The Italian Garden – it’s the best way to take in the beautiful surroundings!

With so much to see at The Gardens this week, you will be sure to feel truly inspired.

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon (Flowering maple)
  • Acanthus spinosus ( Bear’s breeches)
  • Achillea
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Alocasia ( Elephant’s ear)
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Aruncus (Goat’s beard)
  • Astilbe
  • Astrantia (Masterwort)
  • Begonia
  • Callistemon
  • Catalpa bignonioides( Indian bean tree)
  • Centaurea macrocephala (Giant knapweed)
  • Cereus ‘Queen of The Night’ ( Night blooming cactus)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Dahlia
  • Delphinium
  • Dianthus (Pinks)
  • Dierama (Angel’s fishing rod)
  • Fuchsia
  • Helianthemum (Rock rose)
  • Hemerocallis (Daylily)
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Inula
  • Lathyrus (Sweet pea)
  • Lavendula (Lavender)
  • Leptospermum (Tea tree)
  • Lilium (Lily)
  • Lysimachia
  • Olearia (Daisy bush)
  • Optunia
  • Punica (Pomegranate)
  • Primula pulverulenta (Candelabra primula)
  • Romneya coulteri (Tree poppy)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Rudbeckia (Gloriosa daisy)
  • Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
  • Spartium junceum (Spanish broom)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Tecoma
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Thermopsis villosa (Carolina lupine)
  • Thunbergia
  • Tradescantia
  • Zinnia
 
The Butchart Chronicles : July 18, 2017

Greenhouse Tours in November

When: 

  • Every Sat & Sun in November
  • 10:00 am, 12:00 pm and 2:00 pm

Where:

  • The Gardens
  • Meet at the Visitor Information Centre

Cost: 

  • Free with admission
  • Reservations required / Update: Tours are sold out. We are no longer taking reservations

Greenhouse Tours

Update: 2017 tours are officially sold out.

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Our floral display garden is all about the flowers, many of which start their lives inside the greenhouses under the care of our watchful gardeners.  A Greenhouse Tour is your chance to see behind the scenes and ask questions about what goes on in these unique environments.

It is no secret every beautiful garden begins with TLC from a gardener.  Seedlings flourish in the cozy environment of our greenhouses until they are mature enough to be moved out to the gardens. Each greenhouse is designed for the specific needs of our various plants and provides the optimum conditions. Receiving a balance of hydration, light, and temperature, each seedling is nurtured by one of our dedicated gardeners to prepare it for the graduation from greenhouse to the display garden.

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November is the time of year we give you an exclusive behind-the-scenes peek into our greenhouses.  Poinsettias almost ready for our Magic of Christmas Season and a glimpse of our plants being readied for our indoor Spring Prelude are some of the highlights. We are sure you will take away an appreciation for the preparation it takes to ready our plants for our Five Seasons, and events like the Magic of Christmas season which begins December 1st and runs through until January 6th inclusive.

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Tours are approximately one (1) hour and cover topics such as:
•    Propagation methods using seeds or cuttings
•    Overwintering of plants
•    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practices
•    Challenges of indoor growing
•    Production of our diverse floral displays

 

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Tours are free with admission to The Gardens however they are only available each Saturday and Sunday during November. Tours begin at 10:00 am, 12:00 pm and 2:00 pm and last approximately one hour. They begin at the Visitor Centre 15 minutes prior to the scheduled time and are limited to 15 people. (Please note the tours are not easily accessible for wheelchairs or children under 12) For more information or to make a reservation, please call 250-652-4422 x 203. Reservation line opens on Monday, Oct. 16th at 9am. Reservations will only be taken Monday – Friday 9am – 3pm

Reservations being taken beginning Oct. 16th.

Reserve early as space books quickly!

 

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The Butchart Chronicles : July 14, 2017

Flower and Garden Report July 13th - 19th, 2017

Flower and Garden Report  July 13th – 19th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

From the moment you arrive at The Gardens, you become very aware of the surrounding beauty. The Butchart Gardens is an oasis nestled among the stunning backdrop of a mature forest on the shores of beautiful Tod Inlet. Impressive Thuja plicata (Western red cedar) and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas fir) tower along the pristine green water providing an idyllic setting.

Along the entrance road, Robinia pseudocacacia ‘Frisia’ (Golden form of a Black locust tree) compliment Prunus cerasifera ‘Pissardii’ (Purple plum) in majestic form. The promise of the imposing garden lures you in.

Once inside The Gardens, it is not uncommon to become lost in the beauty. With so much to see this time of year, it is easy to spend hours wandering the paths.

The container plantings are stunning, with inspired combinations of unusual plants and classic favorites. Tropical plants accent our traditional plantings; Alocasia ‘Sarian’ (Elephant’s ear) is bold and daring; Brugmansia (Angel’s trumpet) makes an impression while the Phormium adds structure.

Our Children’s Garden is whimsical. Bursting with a collection of unusual plants - Abutilon, Colocasia, Farfugium and Iochroma (Ornamental eggplant) accented by exotic grass Cyperus papyrus ‘King Tut’and striking Hakonechloa macra.

Hint: At nightfall, be sure to look for the Cereus (Night blooming cactus) with its unique funnel- shaped flowers.

While there is endless exploring to be had, it's nice to take a rest in the cool shade on the Concert Lawn and simply enjoy the moment because you still have the rest of the garden to explore. I recommend that you stop to smell the Cosmos atrosanguineus (Chocolate cosmos) on the left before you reach the Japanese Garden- you will be pleasantly surprised!

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon ‘Red Tiger’(Flowering maple)
  • Acanthus spinosus ( Bear’s breeches)
  • Achillea
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Alchemilla (Lady’s mantle)
  • Alocasia ( Elephant’s ear)
  • Anigozanthos (Kangaroo paw)
  • Aruncus (Goat’s beard)
  • Astilbe
  • Astrantia (Masterwort)
  • Begonia
  • Bletilla ( Chinese ground orchid)
  • Callistemon
  • Catalpa speciosa ( Northern catalpa)
  • Centaurea macrocephala (Giant knapweed)
  • Cereus ‘Queen of The Night’ ( Night blooming cactus)
  • Cornus kousa (Kousa dogwood)
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus  (Chocolate cosmos)
  • Delphinium
  • Dianthus (Pinks)
  • Dierama (Angel’s fishing rod)
  • Fuchsia
  • Helianthemum (Rock rose)
  • Hemerocallis (Daylily)
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Inula
  • Lathyrus (Sweet pea)
  • Lavendula (Lavender)
  • Leptospermum (Tea tree)
  • Lilium (Lily)
  • Lysimachia
  • Philadelphus (Mock orange)
  • Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’ (Mayapple)
  • Primula pulverulenta (Candelabra primula)
  • Romneya coulteri (Tree poppy)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
  • Spartium junceum (Spanish broom)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Thermopsis villosa (Carolina lupine)
  • Thunbergia
  • Tradescantia

 
The Butchart Chronicles : July 7, 2017

Flower and Garden Report July 6th - 12th , 2017

Flower and Garden Report July 6th – July 12th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Summer evenings at The Butchart Gardens are special. They instill life long memories of moments when time just seems to stand still. An evening visit to The Gardens is nothing short of enchanting as it is usually a quieter time, the air is warm and the low sunlight softly filters among the trees creating a peaceful ambiance.

Sometimes it’s the little things that catch the eye like a Hummingbird enjoying the sweet nectar from a dazzling Fuchsia and the delicate Nymphaea (Water lily) floating on the tranquil Sunken Garden Lake - also something not to be missed!

My personal favorite bloom this week is the Catalpa speciosa (Nothern catalpa), located on the Concert Lawn. This tree bears beautiful white orchid-like blossoms that are simply stunning in the evening light.

Finally, particularly significant these days is our Begonia collection. While we grow many types, it is the Tuberous begonias that steal the show. These gorgeous flowers cascade from hanging baskets, and are in flower beds planted in profusion. With over 10,000 plants in vivid colours, bright oranges, vibrant yellows, bold reds, shades of pink to classic white, the Tuberous begonias are the definite showstoppers of The Gardens this week.

Enjoy!

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon ‘Red Tiger’(Flowering maple)
  • Acanthus spinosus ( Bear’s breeches)
  • Achillea
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Alchemilla (Lady’s mantle)
  • Alocasia ( Elephant’s ear)
  • Aruncus (Goat’s beard)
  • Astilbe
  • Astrantia (Masterwort)
  • Baptisia
  • Begonia
  • Bletilla ( Chinese ground orchid)
  • Catalpa speciosa ( Northern catalpa)
  • Centaurea macrocephala (Giant knapweed)
  • Clematis
  • Cornus kousa (Kousa dogwood)
  • Cosmos
  • Delphinium
  • Dianthus (Pinks)
  • Fuchsia
  • Helianthemum (Rock rose)
  • Hemerocallis (Daylily)
  • Hydrangea
  • Iochroma
  • Inula
  • Kalmia (Mountain laurel)
  • Kolkwitzia (Beauty bush)
  • Lathyrus (Sweet pea)
  • Lavendula
  • Leptospermum (Tea tree)
  • Lysimachia
  • Philadelphus (Mock orange)
  • Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’ (Mayapple)
  • Primula pulverulenta (Candelabra primula)
  • Romneya coulteri (Tree poppy)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
  • Sambucus
  • Spartium junceum (Spanish broom)
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Styrax
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Thermopsis
  • Thunbergia
  • Tradescantia

 
The Butchart Chronicles : June 30, 2017

Flower and Garden Report June 29th - July 5th

Flower and Garden Report June 29th – July 5th, 2017

By Thea Hegland, Horticultural Assistant

Walking around today I feel so fortunate to be here. The weather has been wonderful and the garden is responding rapidly. The annuals have all been planted and the perennial borders are bringing pleasant surprises daily. Fragrance is everywhere and flowers are coming fast and furious. I am excited to see what’s around the next corner down the meandering paths today.

Descending into the Sunken Garden I am mesmerized by the sweet smell of Spartium junceum, Spanish broom. The bright yellow blooms are up on the top of the old Quarry, on the left-hand side, as you look down. Not to be confused with the ever invasive Scotch broom (Cystisus coparius), the Spanish broom is a true garden delight.

The Rose Garden is coming into its glory right on time in spite of our long, cold winter and spring. Entering the Rose Garden you will pass fragrant Sweet peas. Gorgeous Rose blossoms spilling over arbors seem endless. Delphiniums grace the background in shades of blue. Sweet alyssum borders the Rose Garden adding to the wonderful summer fragrance.

After the delights of the Rose Garden, the Japanese Garden never disappoints. It offers the quietest surprises. Amongst the canopy of Japanese maples, lush Bamboo and delicate Ferns you will find some exquisite blossoms on the Podophyllum, ‘Spotty Dotty” (Mayapple). See if you can spot it.

Take your time and enjoy the many wonders of The Butchart Gardens this week.

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon ‘Red Tiger’(Flowering maple)
  • Acanthus spinosus ( Bear’s breeches)
  • Achillea
  • Aconitum  (Monkshood)
  • Alchemilla (Lady’s mantle)
  • Aruncus (Goat’s beard)
  • Astilbe
  • Astrantia (Masterwort)
  • Baptisia
  • Centaurea macrocephala (Giant knapweed)
  • Clematis
  • Cornus kousa (Kousa dogwood)
  • Cosmos
  • Delphinium
  • Dianthus (Pinks)
  • Helianthemum (Rock rose)
  • Hemerocallis (Daylily)
  • Hydrangea
  • Inula
  • Kalmia (Mountain laurel)
  • Kolkwitzia (Beauty bush)
  • Lathyrus (Sweet pea)
  • Lavendula
  • Leptospermum (Tea tree)
  • Lysimachia
  • Philadelphus (Mock orange)
  • Podophyllum ‘Spotty Dotty’ (Mayapple)
  • Polemonium
  • Primula pulverulenta (Candelabra primula)
  • Romneya coulteri (Tree poppy)
  • Rosa (Rose)
  • Salpiglossis sinuata (Painted tongue)
  • Sambucus
  • Spartium junceum (Spanish broom)
  • Stachys
  • Stewartia
  • Streptocarpus (Cape primrose)
  • Styrax
  • Thalictrum (Meadow rue)
  • Thermopsis
  • Thunbergia
  • Tradescantia

 
The Butchart Chronicles : June 23, 2017

Canada Day 2017 at The Butchart Gardens

Celebrate Canada Day at The Gardens

Join us as we celebrate Canada's 150th Anniversary this Canada Day

What better way to ring in July 1st than with beautiful gardens, live music and fireworks?

We look forward to welcoming locals and visitors from around the world on this special day.

To help plan your visit, we have answered a few frequented asked questions below.

Do I need to reserve tickets?

No. You have the option of buying tickets ahead of time on our website or when you arrive at the admission gate. Fireworks and the concert are included with your admission price.

What time does the concert start and who is performing?
7:15pm, Tropic Mayhem

What time do the fireworks start?
10:15pm

Is it family friendly?

Absolutely! Plus, if you're bringing a stroller, utilize any of the accessible pathways throughout The Gardens


Can I bring a picnic?
Yes. Feel free to bring your own picnic and picnic blanket. Please do not bring your own alcohol. We would be pleased to serve you at one of our licensed venues.

Can I purchase food there?
Yes. Choose from a quick grab-and-go snack in the Coffee Shop, a meal at the family friendly cafeteria-style Blue Poppy Restaurant or reserve in advance for fine dining in the Dining Room Restaurant. There's also pre-packaged picnics available on Firework Saturdays.

What else is there to do?
- Rose Carousel for children and adults (complimentary on Canda Day)
- Boat Tours, a 45-minute scenic tour of Butchart Cove and beyond
- Play a game of chess on a giant chess board
- Treat yourself to house-made gelato at the Gelateria
- Shop for garden gadgets, seeds, gifts and much more at the Seed and Gift Store

Friendly reminder
Selfie sticks and smoking/vaping is not permitted anywhere on property.

 
The Butchart Chronicles : June 23, 2017

Flower and Garden Report June 22nd - 28th, 2017

Flower and Garden Report June 22nd - 28th, 2017

Written by Rick Los, Director of Horticulture

Summer has arrived and we are so thankful that the beautiful weather that is synonymous with summer has also arrived! We have had to deal with cool, cloudy and inclement weather over the past few weeks so this is a welcome relief.  

In spite of the weather, I have been very impressed with our Rose Garden this year as it’s just exploding with colour! As an added bonus, the delightful fragrances that emanate from these flowers is much more prevalent as the temperatures rise. Something to watch for in the coming week are the dozens of arches and fence lines that are draped with climbing roses of all types – these displays are simply spectacular.          

Throughout the gardens the bountiful borders of beddings plants are providing an abundance of early summer colour. Many of these borders have been cleverly designed so that the colour scheme will evolve throughout the summer – if you visit often, you will probably have noticed this.   

Some features that I would like to draw your attention to this week are the topiary figures that we have on display in various areas of the garden. We have a collection of both moss and living plant topiaries that you can find singularly or in small groupings. The most impressive display of topiaries that you will find here at the Gardens is featured on top of the roof of the Carousel building. Please take the time to check this out when you are in this area or you will miss this little bit of creative genius that our staff have put together for you to enjoy, 

As I mentioned last week, I encourage every visitor to take their time as they wander through the garden as there are many gems such as these that often get overlooked.

Plants that are blooming or coming into bloom

  • Abutilon
  • Achillea
  • Alchemilla
  • Anthriscus
  • Aruncus
  • Astilbe
  • Astrantia
  • Baptisia
  • Clematis
  • Cornus kousa
  • Cosmos
  • Delphinium
  • Dianthus
  • Helianthemum
  • Hemerocallis (Daylily)
  • Hydrangea
  • Inula
  • Kalmia
  • Kolkwitzia (Beauty bush)
  • Lathyrus (Sweet pea)
  • Lavendula
  • Leptospermum (containers)
  • Lysimachia
  • Philadelphus
  • Polemonium
  • Primula pulverulenta – Candelabra primula
  • Sambucus
  • Stachys
  • Stewartia
  • Styrax
  • Thalictrum
  • Thermopsis
  • Thunbergia
  • Tradescantia

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